Posted in 40-Day Challenge, Air, Change, Covid-19, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Gifts, Gratitude, Home, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Portals & Pathways, Quotes, Sky, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Woods

A Wednesday wander: Dharma

In the magnolia.

In the first movement, our infancy as a species, we felt no separation from the natural world around us. Trees, rocks, and plants surrounded us with a living presence as intimate and pulsing as our own bodies. In that primal intimacy, which anthropologists call “participation mystique,” we were as one with our world as a child in the mother’s womb.

Then self-consciousness arose and gave us distance on our world. We needed that distance in order to make decisions and strategies, in order to measure, judge and to monitor our judgments. With the emergence of free-will, the fall out of the Garden of Eden, the second movement began — the lonely and heroic journey of the ego. Nowadays, yearning to reclaim a sense of wholeness, some of us tend to disparage that movement of separation from nature, but it brought us great gains for which we can be grateful. The distanced and observing eye brought us tools of science, and a priceless view of the vast, orderly intricacy of our world. The recognition of our individuality brought us trial by jury and the Bill of Rights.

Now, harvesting these gains, we are ready to return. The third movement begins. Having gained distance and sophistication of perception, we can turn and recognize who we have been all along. Now it can dawn on us: we are our world knowing itself. We can relinquish our separateness. We can come home again — and participate in our world in a richer, more responsible and poignantly beautiful way than before, in our infancy.”

~Joanna Macy, World as Lover, World as Self

Continue reading “A Wednesday wander: Dharma”

Posted in 40-Day Challenge, Air, Change, Covid-19, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Garden, Gifts, Gratitude, Health & Well-Being, Home, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Weather, Wonder, Yoga

Leaving March on a chilly day

At sunrise this morning, before the clouds took over the sky.

… I am afraid that many of us with privilege have been able to become very naïve about pain and suffering in the United States and the Western world. We simply don’t have time for it. However, by trying to handle all suffering through willpower, denial, medication, or even therapy, we have forgotten something that should be obvious: we do not handle suffering; suffering handles us— in deep and mysterious ways that become the very matrix of life and especially new life. Only suffering and certain kinds of awe lead us into genuinely new experiences. All the rest is merely the confirmation of old experience.

… In this time of suffering we have to ask ourselves, what are we going to do with our pain? Are we going to blame others for it? Are we going to try to fix it? No one lives on this earth without it. It is the great teacher, although none of us want to admit it. If we do not transform our pain, we will transmit it in some form. How can we be sure not to transmit our pain onto others? 

~ Richard Rohr

Knowing how to create moments of joy and happiness is crucial for our healing. It’s important to be able to see the wonders of life around us and to recognize all conditions for happiness that already exist.

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

Continue reading “Leaving March on a chilly day”

Posted in 40-Day Challenge, Air, Beginnings, Change, Covid-19, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Food, Garden, Gifts, Gratitude, Home, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photo Challenge/Assignment, Photography, Quotes, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Wonder

A good thing

Look what’s popping up!

Put down the weight of your aloneness and ease into the conversation.  The kettle is singing even as it pours you a drink, the cooking pots have left their arrogant aloofness and seen the good in your at last… Everything is waiting for you.

~ David Whyte

Continue reading “A good thing”