Posted in Fire, Food, Gifts, Home, Life, Mindfulness, Photography, Quotes, Recipes, Souper Sunday, Spirit, Winter

Souper Sunday and more

Shrimp & andouille gumbo.

Gumbo, of all other products of the New Orleans cuisine, represents a most distinctive type of the evolution of good cookery under the hands of the famous Creole Cuisinieres of old new Orleans.

~ from The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book, 1901

Creole potato salad.

M and I decided to have a late Mardi Gras celebration with some gumbo and Creole potato salad yesterday.  The reasons are simple.  We were busy on Fat Tuesday this year, and we saw a program on PBS that brought about intense gumbo cravings.  That program was New Orleans Cooking with Kevin Belton.  He was making — you guessed it — shrimp and andouille gumbo, Creole potato salad, and for dessert, a King cake.  We skipped the King cake.

I am unable to share Mr. Belton’s recipe with you because I was unable to find it online.  It was on Episode 115, Carnival.  I’m not sure you’ll be able to find that, either.  What M and I decided to do (this was a shared cooking experience) was start with a basic gumbo recipe for the sake of proportions (how much flour and how much oil for the roux, etc.) and then cooked it up the way Kevin did on his program.  It was a little backwards for me.  I’m used to making the stew or soup and then adding the roux.  Kevin made the roux first, sauteed the trinity (onions, celery, and bell pepper) in the roux, added the andouille and stock, and put the shrimp in at the end.  There was no okra in this version of gumbo.  I’m fine and dandy with that.  I don’t care much for okra.

Hot & sour soup

I made a Hot & Sour Shiitake Soup on Friday.  I picked up a cold virus while visiting with Little Wookie last weekend, and nothing helps cure the common cold like hot and sour soup.  Instead of a fresh jalapeno, which I didn’t have, I threw in some chili garlic sauce which also made the soup look a little oily.  I would normally use vegetable stock for a vegetarian version, but I happened to have some chicken stock in the freezer (and they say chicken broth is also helpful in curing a cold).

There is enough gumbo and hot & sour soup to get us through the next few cold days.  I’m looking forward to the leftover gumbo.  The flavors seem to be more intense once the gumbo has had a chance to cool and sit for a while.

Thanks for dropping in for some soup and salad.  Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

A few of the 10,000 reasons to be happy:  141)  Hot soup on a cold day.  142)  Morning coffee.  143)  Sleeping in on Sunday.  144)  Shared laughter.  145)  The cooling power of potato salad after the spiciness of gumbo.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

9 thoughts on “Souper Sunday and more

  1. It all looks yummy! What makes the potato salad creole?
    We’re supposed to have a big snow storm tomorrow night into Tuesday, so I decided to make borscht. I haven’t made it all winter. Mine is vegetarian, and I think it must be great for colds, which my husband is just getting over. Maybe all that Vitamin C will prevent me from getting it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I heard there is a nor’easter on the way. Right now they’re saying we’ll only get rain. Borscht is great for preventing colds. And it’s another of my favorite soups. I especially like it after we’ve been traveling. It’s a great detox soup. 🙂
      The thing that made the potato salad creole was the seasoning. The recipe calls for a creole mustard, but I didn’t have any so I used Dijon and liberally sprinkled on some creole seasoning. It’s a very simple salad. Potatoes, celery, creole mustard (if you have it), and mayo. There is less mayo because there is a goodly amount of mustard which makes it just as creamy. Apple cider vinegar was included in the list of ingredients, but I found I didn’t need it with all the mustard and seasoning.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. All looks delicious – I need to make some soup before the storm comes. There won’t be any warm sunshine to sit in to warm me, like I have had the past few days. I love the passive solar gain we get this time of year, warms the house right up. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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