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A Tuesday meander at the Point

A clean slate.
A clean slate.

a rolling sea
in dreams of walking
beautiful lines grow tall
in blurred woods
as an illusion of clouds drift by
while the moon stands still
I am enchanted
by garden owls

~ Search Engine poetry (lines borrowed from the search engine terms that bring people to my blog)

An evening at the Point.
An evening at the Point.

As it is cloudy and drizzling today, I thought we might want to go back in time a few days and meander on the beach at the Point.  It is just before sunset, and the beach has been swept clean by winter waves.  The colors of the marsh grasses are being warmed by the sun’s light as it sinks lower in the sky.  Step carefully.  Even in winter the periwinkle snails come to the grasses to feed.  Did you know that in cold weather they pull themselves into their shells and then roll in hopes of ending up back in the water?

Holes in the beach.
Holes in the beach.

You will also want to watch for holes near the edge of the beach area.  They are about knee deep for me, or at least I think they are that deep.  They could be deeper.  My booted foot went through one the last time I went to the Point when there was snow and ice covering the beach.  I used my superpower, the one that helps me leap out of ditches in a single bound, to propel myself out of the hole before I discovered where the bottom happens to be if, indeed, there is a bottom because for all I know, it is bottomless.

Getting closer to the Eagle Tree.
Getting closer to the Eagle Tree.

There really isn’t much beach to walk at the Point.  If you’re out for exercise and a goodly amount of mileage, you could walk the road we took to get to the Point.  Your walk back will take you through tall marsh grasses with a few dead trees (loblolly pines) standing as sentinels along the road.  Then you will pass through a wooded area before coming to large swaths of farm fields, some of them the emerald green of winter wheat.  On your right you’ll find the Church in the Shire (which is not its real name), and eventually you’ll come to a small neighborhood, just a few homes close together with farm fields on one side and across the road.  Just past this little “neighborhood,” you’ll come to the road where I live.  You could turn there if you want to go to the ranch or wish to go south to the creek, or you could continue forward.  If forward is your choice, there will be a few more turns you could make that will keep you off the highway (which is where you’ll end up if you keep moving straight ahead, or fairly straight ahead; there are curves in the road).  The distance to the highway, as the crow flies, is about 5.20 miles, but there are, as noted, curves so it’s probably at least another half mile or so longer.

The Eagle Tree. I named it the Eagle Tree because we frequently see a bald eagle perched in this tree during the winter months.
The Eagle Tree. I named it the Eagle Tree because we frequently see a bald eagle perched in this tree during the winter months.

The main beach area at the Point, the beach you saw at the beginning of our walk, is where people swim.  Or where they would swim.  I’ve only seen people swimming there once or twice in the three years we’ve been here.  The Point is not a particularly popular area for swimming or for much of anything else even though the water gets good grades in terms of safety.  We mostly see folks out there fishing during the warmer months and even then, there aren’t many of them.  In the winter, the place is practically deserted.  Every now and then some other brave soul will come out to see the winter sunset, but it’s rare.

The Low Tide beach.
The Low Tide beach.

There is a smaller beach area that is only accessible during low tide.  Even then, you have to take a small hop across a stream that runs from the marsh into the river.  The river, of course, runs into the sound and the sound runs into the bay and the bay runs into the ocean.  It’s all connected.

A streamlet taking the water back to sea.
A streamlet taking the water back to sea.

Once we get to the end of this beach, there is no place to go unless you want to trudge through the marsh grasses.  You’ll want tall boots for that.  Maybe even hip boots.  It is, as you might expect, marshy and mucky.

Where the stream meets the beach.
Where the stream meets the beach.

Nature is ever at work building and pulling down, creating and destroying, keeping everything whirling and flowing, allowing no rest but in rhythmical motion, chasing everything in endless song out of one beautiful form into another.

~John Muir

Goodnight, Sun.
Goodnight, Sun.

The Point is one of my favorite areas to photograph around here.  Oh, I love the wild horses, the beaches, and the marshes of Assateague, but the Point feels more accessible to me.  Not as grand.  Familiarity might be a factor, too.  The more I photograph an area, the more I see and appreciate.  I’m not sure how many times I’ve been to the Point since moving to the Eastern Shore.  At least once or twice a week, maybe more.

M in the distance, near the end of the small beach area.
M in the distance, near the end of the small beach area.

It is almost always windy at the Point and on this walk, the wind is cold and biting.  We will want to leave soon.  Once the sun goes down, it cools off quickly.

A quiet sunset.
A quiet sunset.

It was a quiet sunset this evening, not the showy kind we often see in winter.  That doesn’t make it any less beautiful.  Sometimes I prefer a quiet sunset.  The peacefulness of a quiet sunset nestles in the way the sun nuzzles with the horizon just before it disappears.

Beautiful.
Beautiful.

Thank you for joining me on another meander.  We are not likely to see a sunset this evening.  I will keep an eye out, just in case, and if it looks like it will clear in time, let’s go to the dock to watch it.  It’s scheduled for 5:09 PM, but we’ll need to go at least 20 minutes prior to that if we want to see the sun dip below the tree line.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

One last look from the road before we leave.
One last look from the road before we leave.

A few of the 10,000 reasons to be happy:  91)  Long walks.  92)  Beautiful sunsets.  93)  The gifts of nature.  94)  My new rain slicker which came in handy today.  The old one had to be duct taped to fix a long rip in the back.  I was sorry to see it go as it was a good raincoat, but the new one is good, too.  Not quite as warm, but layering my clothing takes care of that problem.  95)  Visiting with friends.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

18 thoughts on “A Tuesday meander at the Point

  1. Wonderful post, Robin.
    I love your search engine poem–very cool!
    And I’m happy to have found out about your superpower (which, of course, I suspected), as well as the doings of snails.
    As for the photos–stunning and glorious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Eliza. 🙂 It’s my favorite way to end the day, but have to admit that sometimes I am lazy about bundling up to go out there. My goal this year is to say yes to more sunsets and sunrises.

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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