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If we were having coffee: In which I ramble on and on and on

The sun approaching the threshold of the trees.
A sunrise from this week.   (Taken with my phone.)

 

Love is the bridge between you and everything.

~ Rumi

A window on the sky.
A window on the sky just after sunrise.

If we were having coffee, I would be delighted to see you again.  Come on in out of the rain!  Hugs if you’re amenable to hugs.  Let’s have a seat in the kitchen today where we can look out at the pond and watch the Great Blue Heron and Kingfisher.  You might want to keep an eye on the juniper as well.  Several different birds have been coming over to eat the berries and, just above it, the Northern Flickers have been looking for something up on the roof.  Or maybe they just enjoy sitting there and surveying the front lawn.

On a frosty morning before the snow melted.
On a frosty morning before the snow melted.

As for beverages, there’s the usual wide assortment of things to drink from coffee to tea to hot cider and hot cocoa.  You’ll probably want a hot or warm drink today since it’s so chilly and damp outside.  The weather oracles were originally predicting snow and ice for today, but it’s just a tad too warm for that.  It will be all rain for us this time around.  That’s too bad.  The snow is so much prettier.

Mother Nature's sparkle.
Mother Nature’s sparkle.

How are you?  What have you been doing lately?  Have you traveled anywhere?  Seen or experienced anything new?  Taken any classes or workshop?  Written a book?  Painted a picture?  Have you read any good books or watched any good films?

Frosty covering.
Frosty covering.

I am still reading The Girls by Emma Cline.  I’m almost finished, and I’m not sure what to think about it.  The writing is good and the story is somewhat interesting.  Maybe the problem I have with it stems from the real story — that of the Charles Manson family — it borrows from.  There are aspects of the book and story that just don’t ring true to the time period.  Or at least they don’t for me and what I remember of the feel of  growing up in that era, but I was young and memories can be so malleable.

Speaking of what I remember and the 60’s era, M and I watched Steal This Movie! last night.  While I do remember hearing about Abbie Hoffman and the Chicago Seven (originally Eight), I didn’t remember the details.  I thought the film was entertaining, but most of all I thought about how we could use some of that sort of resistance from the young these days, particularly the satire.  I put Hoffman’s book “Revolution for the Hell of It” on my reading list.  Just because.  Perhaps the times call for it.

Traces of gifts.
Traces of gifts.

If we were having coffee, I would tell you that I still struggle with blogging lately.  It’s not that I don’t want to write.  The problem is that every time I sit down to write a blog post, I end up writing and deleting whole sections dealing with current events and politics.  I’ve thought about starting another blog to deal with that aspect of life, but honestly, I don’t want to put the time into it.

Queen Anne's Lace crowned with winter jewels.
Queen Anne’s Lace crowned with winter jewels.

If we were having coffee, tea, or something else to drink, I would tell you that I’ve done it again.  I wrote reams (maybe a slight exaggeration) about how I’m feeling about the political situation and then deleted much of it.  Here is what was left when I finished censoring myself (feel free to skip over this section and move on to the section just past the next quote from Rumi if you’d rather not be dragged into thinking about current events):

I saw a comment by someone I know on Facebook that mentioned how happy she was that people will no longer have to be politically correct under the guy that won the election.  She believes that political correctness is a violation of her free speech (some say, according to this Washington Post story, that it “stifles free expression”).  I believe being politically correct is about respect and kindness, about not being mean and not making fun of others who are different from you.  When I look at the way we approach just this one issue, I have to ask:  How do you reconcile those two differences?  How do we even begin to cross that kind of divide in beliefs and thinking?  Is love enough to bridge that gap?  And is the gap really as wide as I think it is or is this just another case of someone parroting what they’ve heard and read without giving much thought to what it means?  The whole issue of political correctness, when you delve into it, appears to be as bogus as the War on Christmas.  Another way to detract and deflect?

I ask these things because I thought this person was a friend.  I thought I knew my friend.  When I start questioning what I know about my friends and the friendships themselves, I also start questioning my own judgment.  (I could also question the judgment of people who fall for what is, to me, a red herring — keep your eyes on the shiny object of Political Correctness and ignore the man behind the curtain who won’t release his tax returns — but that is an entirely different kettle of fish.)

Brought into being.
Brought into being.

If we were having coffee or some other beverage, I would tell you that I know there are a lot of people questioning a lot of things these days, and maybe, just maybe, that’s a Very Good Thing.  Maybe it means we will be waking up from our complacency.  It might also mean that there will come a time when I feel like I have to write about all the things I don’t write about now.  If that happens, it will be time for another blog.

You knock at the door of reality, shake
your thought-wings, loosen your shoulders, and open.

~ Rumi

Turkey tail (fungus).
Turkey tail (fungus).

If we were having coffee, I would tell you that I just completed Week 1 of an online Coursera course titled Making Sense of the News: News Literacy Lessons for Digital Citizens.  It’s been very interesting so far.  I thought, when I signed up, that I am pretty good at discriminating between news and fakes news, but I forgot about bias and propaganda which, according to this piece, might be worse than fake news.  The suggested reading and videos have been quite thought-provoking, and I have already learned a lot of things I didn’t know (because I spend a lot of time in my own little bubble, it seems).

Skull in the woods.
Skull in the woods.

If we were having coffee, I would tell you that we had a couple of warm days this week, and all the snow from the weekend is gone.  It was even warm enough to open up some doors and windows and let the fresh air in.  I stood out on the deck one afternoon in shorts and a tank top, soaking in the sunlight.  They say the more skin you expose to the sunlight, the more vitamin D your body will manufacture.  It was quite a mood boost, all that sunlight.

Discarded bones of a myrtle.
Discarded bones of a myrtle.

If we were having coffee, tea, or some other beverage, I would say it is time I stopped rambling and turn this over to you.  Thank you so much for stopping by for another coffee chat.  I always enjoy your visits.  Please feel free to stay awhile and help yourself to more coffee, tea, or whatever you’re drinking.  I have a few chores I need to tend to, and then there’s dinner to prepare.  Rumor has it that M is cooking tonight (a fish stew and meatballs made with fresh tuna), and he’ll probably want a bit of help.  I don’t think we’ll see a sunset this evening given all the cloud cover, but if it should look like we will, let’s head to the Point.  It was beautiful there yesterday.  Sunset is scheduled for 5:06 PM.  The days sure are growing longer.

On the beach at the Point yesterday evening.
On the beach at the Point yesterday evening.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Driftwood.
Driftwood and footprints.

This post is in response to Part Time Monster’s #WeekendCoffeeShare.  Thank you to Diana for hosting it. Put the kettle on, start the coffee maker, open a bottle of wine, or whatever your preference is, and join us.  I’d love to hear all about what you were up to this week.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

37 thoughts on “If we were having coffee: In which I ramble on and on and on

  1. Lovely hoarfrost, Robin. I’m always impressed with those who brave the cold and get out early before the sun melts it.
    We saw the movie ‘Hidden Figures’ and thought it was very good. Recommended.
    I can empathize with your struggles regarding the political scene. I can barely partake of any of it, as I always come away discouraged and depressed. This week ahead is one of mourning for me, and I really am trying to be optimistic! I keep telling myself, ‘This, too, shall pass.’ The world will go on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Eliza. 🙂 I dang near froze my fingers off for those shots, and that with gloves AND mittens on. I’ve noticed that mornings in which we get hoar frost are the mornings I’m most likely to have trouble with the cold. I think it’s a combination of cold and damp that does it. I have “Hidden Figures” on my movie list. As for the struggles, I’ve been studying the counterculture and resistance of the past. Not intentionally. One thing keeps leading to another. I do think I may have to find a way to go to one of the Women’s marches. I don’t think I can make it to D.C., but Philadelphia is looking like a possibility.

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      1. I’ve been thinking of the 60s, too. Revolution is in the air. Let it be peaceful, please god. I heard that there were only roughly 200 DC bus parking permits requested for Jan. 20 and 2000(!) for Jan. 21. The gals are coming to DC!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s hard for me to write much, whether on my blog or Facebook, that doesn’t speak to my dismay at the political direction we’ve chosen. Or had chosen for us. What is it about our social climate that makes people choose to be rude, blind, illogical, and demonstrate no common sense? Why on earth would anyone believe that man is for the “common folk”, will benefit the rural areas of the country, or those of us in the 99%?
    See, that’s how I always end up lately. Sorry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No apologies necessary, Carol. I brought it up. I’m the same way. Everything keeps leading me back to what is going on in our country now. My husband is probably sick to death of hearing me go on and on about it. I’ve been trying to look at both sides lately. I don’t know if it will do any good or not. I don’t normally read the National Review, but there was an article (I won’t link to it — you can probably find it easily through a search) about “Trumpism” and what it is. It was interesting, and helps to explain some things. I should read stuff like that more often, methinks. Part of the reason for the polarization is the way we all live inside echo chambers, only reading or listening to things that suit our beliefs or point of view. I have to admit that I do make sure my blood pressure is down before I try to read things I wouldn’t normally read. lol!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I really like the frosty pictures. I agree about the divide that there is in how people see things. Political correctness is just part of it. There seems to be a way of thinking out there that is totally foreign to me. How do you bridge that gap? If they can’t see that they are being disrespectful, hateful or hurtful, where do you start?

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    1. Thank you, Trent. 🙂 That way of thinking is foreign to me, too, and I think that is the main reason we are in the stew now. People don’t really talk to each other anymore so how can we understand each other? I wish I knew where to start.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I would like to be having coffee with you–or tea, depending upon the time of day. I would like to share with another human being how hard it is to blog or say anything on social media. And how it’s sixteen times harder to respond to any comments. And we would commiserate, surely, and then move on to politics, and probably commiserate in that arena as well, although who knows? I would tell you how sometimes I long for the “old” days when it was possible just to express what needed expressing. And how now it’s all different. We’d say, aw heck, yes I understand, and we’d walk somewhere and see what nature had to say. We’d stare at a sunset and say “yes, that’s it” and we’d go inside to the next new moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Kathy! It’s great to see you again. So glad you could pop in. I would like the same things, to be able to share, to be able to respond to comments and posts on social media in a way that is in line with my beliefs without being insulting or condescending, to be able to just sit down and talk.
      The sunset — yes. That IS it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Robin–so much to comment on. It’s difficult not to mention or discuss the political situation and climate these days. I agree that a war over “political correctness” is as bogus as the “war on Christmas.” I guess some people truly do believe this nonsense, but how can being able to say horrible things about people be a good thing? I don’t get that. But I won’t get started on DT now.

    M’s fish stew sounds yummy. I have a vegetable bean soup simmering, I just baked a loaf of artisan bread. My husband is helping our daughter and son-in-law paint their new house. There will be more about that in my Monday post–some good news for a change. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your soup and bread sound wonderful, Merril. 🙂 I should have come to your house for dinner. M’s stew was, he says, delicious. I could not bring myself to taste it. Too fishy for me, and with too many bits that reminded me of the fish. That’s why vegetarianism suits me best. If I have glimpses of the animal I’m eating, I can’t bear to eat it. It’s somewhat hypocritical, I suppose. And had he used a milder fish, cut into fillets, I would have eaten it (or at least tasted it).
      I don’t get any of it. I will join you in not getting started on DT. None of how I feel about it seems to have done the world any good so there is not a lot of point in continuing to dwell on it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I understand about not wanting to picture the animals. I don’t eat meat, but I will cook it for others–but I really can’t think about it. I think we all do have to keep talking about DT and other horrors so that people don’t become complacent–but we all have to do what we’re comfortable with, too.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Love your photos- how you capture how delicate the flowers and reeds are. I have unfollowed the friends I had on FB who constantly post about politics and the situation. It is a waste of my time to look and there is nothing I can do to change it for another 4 years. I’d like to concentrate on the positive in life!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Lisa (from Daily Musings). 🙂 I haven’t unfollowed anyone on FB (yet), but have removed their posts from my news feed. That way, I can go to their FB page if I want to see what they’re up to without having to be exposed to their politics when I’m not in the mood for it. That goes for all sides of the political spectrum. Unfortunately, I am still finding stuff and unfortunately, I still occasionally post something if it’s an issue that I am passionate about (gun control, poverty, and health care). And, although I hate to admit it, sometimes I fire back articles in response to articles others have posted that contain what is clearly fake news. I really should stop thinking it’s my job to fact check things for others. It’s an old habit from the email days when people would forward stuff without checking it first. FB has pretty much become the dumpster for that (and chain emails!). That’s why I prefer Instagram. It’s a much nicer, much more positive, place. 😀

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      1. I have done what you have when I said I have unfollowed- we are still friends but they don’t show up in my news feed. I was a “fact checker” too- just my nature- but have stopped that also. If I see something I know is crazy I’ll send a private message to the person. Instagram is wonderful and the blogs too- most of the people I follow stay away from the news- or if they do post it is a worthwhile read because they do have something to say. I must say I prefer keeping company with the birds 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. The photos are amazing. I live on the other side of the world from you but everyone here has been avidly following the political situation in the USA. I just finished “The girl with seven names – a north korean defector’s story” and couldn’t put it down. I’ve never given any thought to north korea before but after I finished the book, I’ve been reading up on everything I can find on Google. Have a wonderful week ahead.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Marilyn. 🙂 Wishing you a wonderful week, too. I’ve added the book you mentioned to my reading list. I don’t know much at all about North Korea, and have been trying to do more reading about the world and the people in this world. I was happy to see I could easily find “The girl with seven names.” The last time I wanted to read a book from Korea, I had to order it through a U.K. site. The book was “The Vegetarian” by Han Kang (which, I see, can be purchased through the U.S. version of Amazon now). It’s fiction. Beautifully written, and strangely surreal. I was thinking of challenging myself more this year after reading this blog:

      https://ayearofreadingtheworld.com/what-on-earth-am-i-doing/

      Thanks again for stopping by, and for the book suggestion. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Your photos are lovely. I learned in high school the difference between fact and opinions. Most of what is on the internet and news is an opinion. A lot of it is not. One positive fact about Trump’s election is that I am paying attention to the news. I am reading the articles vin depth before I was just glancing atcthem.I try to get the news from different sources something I learned in high school.
    A fact, Trump has managed to shape up the world before he has been sworn into office. Mexico, China, Japan are all upset and what is going on with Russia.
    It is my opinion that shortly after he is in office a country will challenge.
    Think Positive

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Bettylouise. 🙂 I get my news from different sources too, but I did tend to lean heavily on certain sources and avoid others. I’m a little more rounded these days, and that’s a positive.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. If you want insight into some Trump voters, get Strangers inTheir Own Land by Arlie Russel Hochschild. One of her previous books was The Second Shft. STrangers is interesting and illuminating. It illustrates for me how important it is to get back to listening to each other. We just had rain here today, too, and it was a bit of a relief!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Lisa, for the suggestion. 🙂 I have Strangers in Their Own Land on my book list already (was waiting for it to come out in paperback, but might go ahead and splurge now that you’ve recommended it, or see if the library has it). I read Nickle And Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich a few years back when I worked for Wal-Mart. I do know what kind of struggle Wal-Mart workers go through on a daily basis from having seen it first hand. A married couple, both of them Wal-Mart associates, who had to get food stamps and relied on Medicaid for their sick child’s healthcare and prescriptions because even with two of them working, they had little money to spare (even for basic necessities!). A young woman who had a severe mental illness but couldn’t afford the co-pay for her medications. Ah well, I could go on for a long time and don’t know why I’m rambling about that right now.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for sharing your morning walk with us. I’ve just found you so I hope you’ll forgive the gushing (probably banal) compliments about the way you blend vivid imagery with a cozy, nook-side chat about the issues of the day. Thanks for making my morning a little bit more colorful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome, Gabriel. And thank you so much for the lovely comment and compliments. It didn’t sound gushing or banal at all. I’m so glad you could stop by for the coffee chat, and I look forward to getting to know you a bit more from your blog. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. It’s really disgusting when our incoming leader is a Troll. He talks like a troll, redirects like a troll, and bullies like a troll. He deflects anything he doesn’t like onto some unrelated fault he makes up in the asker. And no one is speaking up about it. Are we really powerless? Did those who voted for this person even listen to him talk ONE time? what to do what to do…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wonder all those things too, Elisa. Especially the part about no one speaking up. Why are those who have the power to do something sitting on their hands after all that’s come to light? Ah well… as you wrote, what to do what to do…

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  12. Good morning! Thanks for having me in from the cold 🙂

    I’m right there with you in relation to our current political climate. It’s all scary and unknown and frustrating and I really do feel like I’m in the Twilight Zone and that this can’t *really all be happening. Alas, it *is. I have no answers, only more questions, and a deep need to curl up at home with my family every chance I get because it is safe there.

    Thank you for sharing your lovely photos, as always. I, too, love your frosty shots…especially as seen fro the warmth of my PJs and cozy couch 😉

    Hope you have a lovely rest of your weekend and week ahead!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. It’s amazing how much we don’t know about our friends. Political correctness is about kindness and respect, as you say, and it’s sad to me that someone is glad that they won’t have to be kind of respectful of others. However, in a way, it might be a good thing because it will show us just who our friends really are and how our society really feels when they are honest with their words.

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  14. Pretty pictures, as per usual. Thanks for sharing.

    I agree with you about kindness. I think some people are using the term political correctness incorrectly — do they think that making fun of disabled people is just not being politically correct….. seriously?

    Your course on the news sounds interesting. I think the one really good thing about all this is that people will pay attention and read more. That will make for better journalism — they need readers to keep them honest. (former journalist speaking here)

    Have a good week!

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  15. Interesting post, interesting comments. It is my opinion that the current situation we find ourselves in has most likely always been with us. Because of social media we are exposed to it more than in the past. The question of political correctness is a related subject. The government workers in Seattle being told not to use the words citizen and brown bag because they might be offensive is the kind of nonsense some of us can’t understand. A student at Sonoma State U. was ordered to take off a cross because someone might be offended crosses the line (pun intended )<; Looking for things to be offended about seems to be a life choice for some these days.
    I spend my winters in Yuma, I think you would all love the numbers of birds we see daily along the Colorado river. The spectacular sunrises and sunsets we get here are a never ending treat. Best of the new year and the new administration to all.

    Like

Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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