Posted in Air, Critters, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Gifts, Gratitude, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Sky, Spirit, Walking & Wandering, Weather, Winter, Wonder

A Monday morning meander through the meadows

Morning light in the meadow grasses.
Morning light in the meadow grasses.

Every tree and plant in the meadow seemed to be dancing, those
which average eyes would see as fixed and still.

~ Rumi

Fuzzy head.
Fuzzy head.

It is a delightfully warm and sunny day here on the Eastern Shore.  I was going to bring you some images from Saturday’s boat tour, but it’s too pretty to pass up today’s offerings.  We can revisit Saturday when the rains come later in the week.

Winter bouquet.
Winter bouquet.

I was sitting in the kitchen early this morning drawing my daily mandala when I heard flapping and then the noise of something walking on the roof.  Izzy and Bella, the cats, jumped up from wherever they were napping and ran from window to window throughout the house, trying to see what was out there.  I knew without looking, but I decided it was a sign that it was a fine time to go out for my walk — a call from nature — and while I was out there, I could see what was happening on the roof.

Turkey vulture waving goodbye.
Turkey vulture waving goodbye.

A kettle (a committee, a venue, a volt, a wake, a flock) of turkey vultures was partying up there, worshiping the sun from the looks of things.  They didn’t stay long once I walked out the door, and the whooshing sound of all those big wings flapping in flight was pretty cool.

Outstretched wings.
Outstretched wings.

We don’t want the vultures hanging out on the roof.  They make a mess of things and can damage the shingles.  After shooing them away, I decided to walk out to the meadows to see what was happening out there.  I tend to stay in the woods during the winter months, sheltering from the wind, but I didn’t need shelter today since it is so warm.

Memory of last summer.
Memory of last summer.

Remember that meadows are places of silent and soft growth.  They trigger a softness in us, replenish hope.  They can serve as a catalyst for recovering joy and fun.

~ Ted Andrews, Nature-Speak

Leaning in.
Leaning in.

There was a lovely breeze blowing through the meadows, soft and warm.  The morning light was wonderful.  Wispy clouds moved overhead, following the vultures to wherever they had gone.

A pop of color.
A pop of color.

Meadows and fields are places of renewal.  Contact with them or images that capture our attention from this type of environment are important messages.  They center around and trigger energies of balance, growth, abundance and fertility.

~ Ted Andrews, Nature-Speak

Ribbons of grass.
Ribbons of grass.

There were deer tracks on the trail, and I flushed out a few birds and rabbits.  It felt and sounded like spring.  Judging from all the singing going on, the birds must have been enjoying the morning as much as I was.

Spotlight.
Spotlight.

As you might recall, we are required by a conservation agreement to mow the meadows every three years.  We had one-third of the meadows mowed last year (you can read about it here and here if you missed it and you’re interested), and had planned to do another third over the winter, but don’t want to have it done until someone has come out to inspect what was mowed last year.  I don’t know what’s taking them so long to come have a look-see.  The main thing is to make sure we pass whatever inspection we were told they would be instituting soon.  I guess it’s not all that soon since no one has bothered to come out.

Gold in the meadow.
Gold in the meadow.

We don’t want to make the mistake of mowing in the spring again while the birds and bunnies are nesting, and after my walk today, I’m thinking we may have to put it off until next winter.  I think spring is going to arrive early this year.

Thistle.
Thistle.

We’ll have to wait until tomorrow to see if Punxsutawney Phil agrees with me.

Goldenrod.
Goldenrod.

That’s about it from the Wabi-Sabi Ranch on this beautiful Monday.  Thank you for stopping by and joining me on another meander.  If the clouds don’t move in before sunset, I think I’ll head out to the Point to watch the show.  Sunset is at 5:25 PM.  If you’d like to join me, I’ll be out there about 15-20 minutes before that so I can take a stroll on the beach.

The meadow grasses are thick in spots.
The meadow grasses are thick in spots.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Today’s joys:  A walk through the meadows; watching the turkey vultures glide and soar overhead; the golds and browns of the grasses and dried flowers in the meadows; cotton-tailed rabbits bounding across the trails; watching the play of light and shadows in the Mystery Woods; fish splashing around in the pond/lagoon.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

30 thoughts on “A Monday morning meander through the meadows

  1. A flock of vultures on the roof! Wow that’s not something you see every day! I love birds but I have to say vultures give me a little bit of the creeps, lol!

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    1. It’s a common sight down here, Karma, and a lot of people complain about it. I don’t mind if they hang out on the outbuildings and the pavilion, but the house roof is off limits. I really like turkey vultures, but I also understand how they would give you the creeps. They’re scary looking birds, especially when their wings are folded and they look like they’re wearing a scary cape.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Noises on my roof usually means the squirrels are racing across – it’s their shortcut to go from tree to tree. Pecking noises, however, mean one of those darned woodpeckers are pecking where they shouldn’t and that requires action on my part.

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    1. I’ve heard woodpeckers can do a lot of damage, Carol. Ours stay out in the trees so no worries about that. We don’t see many squirrels out here. They are shy and hide in the woods, unlike the squirrels we had when we lived in a suburb in Ohio. I did see one under the bird feeders yesterday. I’d like to get a good look at him or her. It might be a Delmarva Fox Squirrel. They are bigger than gray squirrels and are known to be shy.

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  3. Being Australian, I loved all the discussion about vultures, woodpeckers and squirrels. We have none of these. We have Sulphured-crested cockatoos…big white birds with yellow crests. They’re very beautiful and can really strike quite photogenic pose but can rip your house apart if you’re not careful, pulling apart wood with their powerful beak.
    By the way, you really captured the light in these photos. Stunning! xx Rowena

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    1. Thank you, Rowena. 🙂
      Your birds (and other animals) always seem so exotic to me. I suppose it’s a matter of what we’re used to (which, of course, is the whole point of “exotic”). Do you have any type of vultures or buzzards in Australia?

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It’s very spring-like here today, and you’ve probably heard “Phil” saw his shadow.
    We often see turkey vultures around here, and a nearby town has held an annual turkey vulture festival, although not last year. They usually have hundreds of vultures in their town.

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    1. There was a town near us in Ohio (when we lived there) that celebrates the return of the turkey vultures every spring. It’s the same there — they usually have hundreds of them. Their history page is interesting and states:

      “Legend has it that they were first attracted by the tons of butchering refuse and unwanted game left behind in the great Hinckley Hunt of 1818, but additional historical research among the records of the Sylvester Library of Medina uncovered an old manuscript by William Coggswell, who as a youth with his uncle, Gibson Gates, were the first white men to set foot in the township in 1810. This manuscript told of their expedition from Bath and Richfield through Hinckley, and of finding the “vultures of the air” at the gallows at Big Bend of Rocky River around the foot of the ledges where the Wyandots had hanged a squaw for witchcraft two years before. This indicated that these turkey vultures had made their home on Hinckley Ridge long before the white men settled west of the Cuyahoga River, and it moved their occupancy back into the midst of the Indians legend.” (Buzzard Day History, http://hinckleytwp.org/content/buzzard-day-history)

      The NPR story about Phil states he didn’t see his shadow. Having looked at the photo of the Groundhog Club gathered around Phil, I can see why he didn’t. He was in their shadow! The photo is kind of funny because you can clearly see sunlight on some of the men bending over Phil. (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/02/02/465253970/groundhog-day-punxsutawney-phil-did-not-see-his-shadow)

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      1. Thanks for the info, and so funny about Phil and his shadow. It never made sense to me anyway–I mean if you believed this to begin with. I always thought it would make more sense if he did see his shadow then spring would be coming because it was sunny. Never ever asks me though. 🙂

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        1. I know! I’ve thought the same thing. It has something to do with an old rhyme involving Candlemas, I think, but I’d have to look that up.

          Phil is about as accurate as our weather prognosticators which is to say, not much, but sometimes they get it right. 😀

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  5. A wonderful soothing window into you beautiful world Robin, and I love the Ted Andrews quotes on meadows…places of soft growth and renewal…that’s such a delightful thought. Your golden winter images are even more beautiful than usual today 🙂

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  6. Yes, it was an unseasonably warm day in the East. A day for soaring near, and landing to raise awareness. A day for seeing the perfection in winter’s golden hues.

    You’ve got me inspired. I’ll probably start mowing my lawn in thirds this year as well. And you’re so right… no need to rush into things… 🙂

    Peace
    Michael

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      1. Yesterday was such a dreary – rainy and foggy day – and today looks like more of the same, but there is a lot less snow on the ground. I’ll go out soon for a walk, but I think it will be muddy! I’m ready for spring, or at least some blue skies. I don’t mind the cold, just the gray. 🙂

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  7. Love those golden grasses. There is so much beauty and majesty in dormancy, which you’ve captured so well here. The pouring rain today was cold, but blew out tonight on a warm wind, the temps rising to 50, so strange for us this time of year!

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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