Posted in Air, Autumn, Change, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Gifts, Gratitude, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Portals & Pathways, Quotes, Sky, Spirit, Walking & Wandering, Walktober, Water, Weather, Wonder, Woods

Fish swimming in the woods

Hints of blue.
Hints of blue.

The ground we walk on, the plants and creatures, the clouds above constantly dissolving into new formations — each gift of nature possessing its own radiant energy, bound together by cosmic harmony.

~ Ruth Bernhard

The Woodland Trail (the path to the dock) last week.
The Woodland Trail (the path to the dock) last week.  (I picked this image as a “before” shot because of the small wood pile to the right.)

What a difference a day makes!  We have had glimpses of blue sky and sunshine as the clouds continue to spin in and out.  The wind has gentled itself to about 10-12 mph.  It feels breezy rather than turbulent and violent.

An hour before high tide this morning.
The Woodland Trail an hour before high tide this morning.

Our highest tide for this storm event was predicted to happen at high tide this morning.  And it did.  The Woodland Trail was flooded with 6+ inches of water, and there were little fish swimming through the woods and along the trails.  I’ve mentioned before that our woods are magical, and fish swimming on the woodland trails is my proof.  (I know, I know.  There are some who will say it is not truly magic, but if you look at it as magical, it can be.  Seriously, how often do you see fish swimming on paths that run through a forest?)

When I first went out to look at the trail, a squirrel was sitting across from the pile of wood you see in the above photos, trying to figure out how he was going to cross the flooded path.  He delicately dipped one paw into the water, assessing the depth I assume (or temperature?), and then bounded across the path, splashing through the water and running between the trees on the other side.  I’m not sure why he was headed that way.  The wooded area in there is at the edge of the marsh and was also flooded when you get past the higher ground where the trees are sitting.  Maybe his home is up in one of those trees.

Better wear your wellies if you want to hike through the woods today.
Better wear your wellies if you want to hike through the woods today.

I did not make it out on to the dock during my walk early this morning.  There is a low lying area in front of the boardwalk to the dock, and the water was deeper than the coverage of my boots.  I would have had water pouring into my wellies which pretty much defeats the purpose of wearing them.

It's fun to slosh through the woods.
It’s fun to slosh through the woods.

The tide is gentle, rising slowly into and through the woods and marshes.  I’ve mentioned before that there is a deer skeleton in the woods and the bones barely move when the tide comes in this high.  When the water recedes, the skull is usually sitting where it has been sitting since we purchased the ranch, leaning up against a loblolly pine.

Nice reflections.
Nice reflections.

M said there was flooding on some of the roads on his way to work.  Not surprising.  Some of the roads around here are almost at the same level as the creeks and rivers, especially at high tide.

Standing around the new pond.
Standing around the new, and temporary, pond.

I didn’t see any snakes.  I expected to and kept a keen eye out for them.  I usually see quite a few of them during the autumn months in general, sunning themselves to warm up after a chillier night.  When it floods, they come out to get away from the water.  Except for the water snakes, of course, who probably don’t notice the flooding other than to note their water world has expanded.

The sun poured into the woods.
The sun poured into the woods.

When all the world appears to be in a tumult, and nature itself is feeling the assault of climate change, the seasons retain their essential rhythm.  Yes, fall gives us a premonition of winter, but then, winter, will be forced to relent, once again, to the new beginnings of soft greens, longer light, and the sweet air of spring.

~ Madeleine M. Kunin

A mushroom sits on higher ground.
A mushroom sits on higher ground.

We had a little over 3 inches of rain as a result of the nor’easter that swept through.  Hardly the 7-11 inches predicted.  We still have a rain deficit so the rain was more than welcome.  I’m just happy it didn’t come with a hurricane attached to it.

The rain has perked things up, and there are even new plants shooting up out of the ground as a result.  Mushrooms and other fungi are appearing too.  October is the month for mushrooms in our area.  I found a circle of what I think are Amanita flavoconia, a common mushroom found in eastern North America.  They are beautiful.  They are also toxic so I won’t be doing more than admiring them.

The Black-Eyed Susans in the meadow have revived and are blooming along the meadow pathways adding their yellow to that of the goldenrod.  I also found some blooming patches of partridge peas.  Most have turned brown and have gone to seed, but these were new and green and blossoming.

Liquid light.
Liquid light.

I did not find any fallen trees in the forest.  There were a few cedars leaning over one of the paths.  Another good rainfall or wind storm might knock them over.

Two of the cedars in the background are leaning.
Two of the cedars in the background are leaning.

All in all, things are looking pretty good around the property, especially in the woods.  The water has receded, but it might be back again this evening.  We still have a coastal flood advisory in effect until midnight tonight.

Another dry spot. I should point out that higher ground is not that high. Just a few inches above where it floods.
Another dry spot. I should point out that higher ground is not that high. Just a few inches above where it floods.

That’s about it for today’s walk through the woods.  Thanks for walking along with me.  I didn’t make it out to the Point yesterday (too dangerous), but will be going out there this evening to see what’s up out that way.  Feel free to join me.  Sunset is at 6:40 PM.  Maybe we’ll get lucky and Mother Nature will gift us with one of those breathtaking after-the-storm sunsets.

As the (temporary) pond grows.
As the (temporary) pond grows.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Reminder:  If you’re participating in Walktober, please post your pingback or link to your post here.  You have until midnight of October 25, although if you need more time, let me know.  I’ll gladly extend it.  (Click on the Walktober widget in the sidebar to the right if you are unfamiliar with the Walktober event.  It will take you to last year’s post about it.  One of these days I’ll get around to making a Walktober page.)

Leaving the woods.
Leaving the woods before the peak of high tide.

Today’s joys:  Splashing through the woods; beautiful mushrooms circling around a loblolly pine; holes in the clouds where sunshine and blue sky peeks through; breezes instead of blusters; lunch with M.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

10 thoughts on “Fish swimming in the woods

  1. I am relieved to hear you escaped unscathed Robin. A friend in Va was showing me a photo via Skype of her friend’s home with water to the top of the windows…………. it is heartbreaking when such things happen!

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    1. It is heartbreaking, Pauline. So many others had a much rougher time of it than we did. I’ve been keeping an eye on what’s happening in South Carolina. I used to live there, and have friends who are still living in that area. I’ve seen pictures from the Bahamas, too, and can’t begin to imagine what it was like to have that storm circling around for as long as it did.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I think I remember fish swimming in your woods once before. They must have enjoyed it then so they stopped back again this time. I think I had better do my Walktober this week…we fly back from DC on the 22nd…and have something going every day right through that next weekend. I have more time this week…so I am hoping for a bit of sunshine and I’ll put on my walking shoes.

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    1. Yes! They did, Dawn! We’ve had a few super high tides since we moved here, and I think you might be right. The fish like our woods. Not too much, I hope. Just the occasional visit. As for Walktober, do whatever works for you. If you need more time, that can be arranged too. I’m not a stickler for the rules.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. My friend in Sumter, SC, had begun posting his pictures of what used to be his neighborhood but is now more of a lake. They had 21.3 inches of rain. And he just reported that a dam has broken and they are having to evacuate many people. Looks like a lot of people dodged a bullet with this one while others were hit quite hard. I’m glad you are safe and didn’t sustain too much damage!

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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