Posted in Beach, Critters, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Gratitude, Home, Life, Maryland, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Spirit, Summer, Walking & Wandering, Water

The little things

Marsh periwinkle
Marsh periwinkle

Monotony has nothing to do with a place; monotony, either in its sensation or its infliction, is simply the quality of a person.  There are no dreary sights; there are only dreary sight seers.

~ G. K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions

Scraped for food.
Scraped for food.

The last time I went to the Point was with friends when they were here for a visit.  Although it was only a week ago to the day, it feels like it was months ago.  Life is so full lately that time is expanding.  That might not be the only thing expanding given how much time I’ve spent sitting lately.  Yikes.

Marsh grasses.
Marsh grasses.

Anyhow.  While we were at the Point, I peered around in the grasses.  I was looking for the snails that like to hang out on the beach.  They also hang out on the grasses, moving up and down the stalks to feed.  Whether they are up or down depends on the tide.  They eat stuff that collects on the grasses, including algae and fungus.  As the snail moves up and down, it uses something called a radula to scrape the food off the stalks of grass and this shreds the grass.  The snail then leaves some of its own waste inside the tears it makes on the plant.  Fungus grows around it, providing more food for the snail.  Eventually, if this happens too much, it starts to kill off the marsh grasses.

Hanging around at low tide.
Hanging around at low tide.

I am falling way behind when it comes to many things, especially sorting through photos I’ve taken during the past month or two.  I wanted to share these little guys before I forgot about them.  I’m a budding naturalist, I think, becoming more and more interested in the flora and fauna and life I encounter when I’m out and about.

Still trying to figure out what these little purple flowers are.
Still trying to figure out what these little purple flowers are.  They were hanging out with the marsh grasses near the water line.

Thanks for stopping by today.  I hope to get caught up with ya’all soon.  I don’t think we’ll see much of a sunset today so there is no reason to head to the Point unless you want to take a little stroll on the beach.  The remnants of tropical storm Erika are swirling around, creating a thick cloud cover.  I was hoping she would drop some rain on us.  We need it.  But it looks as though it will all go south and east.  If you feel up to it, do a little rain dance for us, please.  Maybe that will help direct some of the precipitation our way.

Beach treasure.
Beach treasure.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Today’s joys:  Unpacking and settling back in at home; a pot of green tea; time for yoga and a walk; an afternoon power nap; puttering around the house.

Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

15 thoughts on “The little things

  1. WInter is coming – and you use more calories staying warm (so I keep hoping my summer “extra” few won’t be permanent)
    “Dreary sight seers” I love that phrase. So true. (Snails I find get transported to the front yard – better for plants and prevents them from becoming a dog toy)
    We’re overcast and rain possible, but not from Erika’s weather system…yet. Whooshing the remnants your way!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Philosophermouse, for giving it a try. Unfortunately the remnants went south of us with barely a drop for us. Our next chance for rain is on Friday so I think I’ll wash the car and hang out laundry. Usually doing one or the other will guarantee rain. 😀

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  2. I love the little snails. Search on water lobelia. That may be your purple flower. Given where you live, you should invest in a copy of Pond Life, a Golden Guide. It’s very small and portable and covers everything I’ve wanted to know about wetlands! Back in the 70’s or early 80’s someone wrote a New Yorker article on it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the suggestions, Lisa! I found Pond Life, a Golden Guide on Amazon, but think I’ll look around at the store in the visitor’s center at Assateague the next time I’m there. They have all sorts of pocket guides, and may just have this one, too. (Plus purchasing it there benefits them rather than Amazon.) It could be water lobelia. I’ll have to get a closer look at the flowers the next time I’m at the Point. The photos become blurry when I try to zoom in on them and it’s difficult to tell for sure.

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  3. Lovely marsh grass photos. I think your plant may be sea lavender (Limonium), a type of statice.
    I learned in a post yesterday that periwinkles are not native – they coat the rocks in Maine – and that they are edible (blech!). I am not a mollusk fan, can you tell? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you, Eliza. 🙂 It could be sea lavender. It looks something like it. I really do need to get a better look at it soon (before it’s gone for the season). I am not a mollusk fan, either. Blech! sums up my feels about eating snails, too.

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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