Posted in Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Garden, Gifts, Gratitude, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Portals & Pathways, Quotes, Spirit, Summer, Walking & Wandering, Weather

A Wednesday Walk

Pretty.
Pretty.

… I want first of all — in fact, as an end to these other desires — to be at peace with myself.  I want a singleness of eye, a purity of intention, a central core to my life that will enable me to carry out these obligations and activities as well as I can.  I want, in fact — to borrow from the language of the saints — to live ‘in grace’ as much of the time as possible.  I am not using this term in a strictly theological sense.  By grace I mean an inner harmony, essentially spiritual, which can be translated into outward harmony…

~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Pixie dust. (Or dew, depending on your state of mind.)
Pixie dust. (Or dew, depending on your state of mind.)

I had intended to take a bike ride today, but the Bare Meadow called so I took a walk instead.  The Bare Meadow, as you may recall, is the meadow we had mowed to be in compliance with our conservation agreement (which states we must keep that acreage as meadow or grassland and must mow it every three years).  It is no longer bare, of course, because life has taken over and all manner of things are growing out there now.

One of the paths through the Bare Meadow.
One of the paths through the Bare Meadow.

M recently mowed the paths through the meadows so this was a good time to explore and see what changes, if any, mowing wrought.  Removing the trees (mostly loblolly pines and sweet gums) and shrubs (mostly myrtles — wax and sea) gave the flowers room to flourish.  We have large patches of Partridge Peas, a legume that the Bobwhite Quail and White-Tailed Deer like to eat.

A patch of Partridge Peas.
A patch of Partridge Peas.

The seed pods have formed, and that may explain why we have quite a few deer in the Bare Meadow early in the morning and again in the evening.

Seed pods (to the left of the middle flower).
Seed pods (to the left of the middle flower).

Morning Glories of various colors wind their way through the meadow, climbing the grasses and the newly emerging sweet gum trees and myrtles.

Wouldn't it be wonderful to glow from within the way the Morning Glories do?
Wouldn’t it be wonderful to glow from within the way the Morning Glories do?

Do you remember the tutorial I posted on how I achieve a soft, but sharp, effect in my images?  I mentioned that you can achieve the same effect almost straight out of the camera under the right conditions.  This morning I discovered exactly what those conditions are.  An extremely humid, hot, cloudy morning.  All I had to do was underexpose the shots a little, and voila!  Instant Orton Effect without having to go through a bunch of steps in Photoshop.

Waking up.
Waking up.

There was just enough light coming through the clouds to highlight the dew and give everything a faint shimmer.

I'm pretty sure I take far too many photos of Morning Glories.
I’m pretty sure I take far too many photos of Morning Glories.

The Black-Eyed Susans are still blooming.  A lot have gone to seed, but we’ll continue to see them blooming for at least another month or two.  If I recall correctly, some of the sheltered Black-Eyed Susans were still blooming in late October and early November last year.  Every time I thought they were finished for the season, a few more would pop up and bloom.

Hanging out with the myrtle and partridge peas.
Hanging out with the myrtle and partridge peas.

I did find two newbies to the meadow.

Tall Ironweed
Tall Ironweed

We had Tall Ironweed in our meadows at Breezy Acres in Ohio.  This is the first time I’ve seen it here.  It’s a native plant.  It can be tough to get rid of if you don’t want it in your meadows or pastures.  One plant can produce from 6,000 to 19,000 seeds.  I don’t mind it.  In fact, I was happy to see it.

Bull Thistle
Bull Thistle

The Bull Thistle is new, too.  Or at least new to me.  It’s the first time I’ve seen it in our meadows here at the ranch.  I know the farmers don’t like it, but I think it’s beautiful.  The rabbits and deer eat the leaves and stems.  Hummingbirds and bees like the nectar.  Goldfinches and Juncos like the seeds.  As for me, I like the purple flowers.

Beautiful yellow flower.
This flower has a name, but I don’t know it yet.

Thank you for joining me on another walk.  I’m going to be spending the next few days with friends here at the Wabi-Sabi Ranch.  If I have time for a postcard or two, I’ll post.  If not, I’ll see you again next week.  Have a great weekend!

Grasses and vines.
Grasses and vines.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Today’s joys:  A walk through the meadows; the Morning Glories; sparkling morning dew; a nice cool drink when I returned from my walk; a delicious breakfast.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

26 thoughts on “A Wednesday Walk

  1. What a wonderful walk. It cooled me a bit in today’s heat. It makes me want to go for a walk too but I think I’ll have to wait a day. Today we’re in the 90s. Tomorrow we’re supposed to be twenty degrees cooler. So tomorrow I’ll take Anderson for a nice walk.

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  2. I love the thistles – and they are dinner for some, as you say, so they can stay!
    The paths through the meadows are wonderful – gives you a ringside path through the local plants and animals in their neighborhoods…keeps you in your place, they probably say
    That first flower reminds me of one of my elder aunts – quite batty as she aged, but so happy about it all. That’s just her color and she’d wear silk flowers like that on lapels or hats. It suited her perfectly.

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    1. Thank you for a great comment, PhilosopherMouse. 🙂 You’re probably right about the paths keeping me in my place. I can just imagine all the rabbits and other critters out there nodding their approval of the paths. I think I’m going to be one of the quite batty aunts as I age (although I suspect there are family members who think I’ve been quite batty all along).

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    1. Thank you, Carol. 🙂 I suppose I should feel guilty, but I don’t. I doubt the thistles will show up in any of the farm fields since the farmers kill all the plants that aren’t corn, soybeans, or wheat.

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  3. Your Anne Lindbergh quote is exactly how I feel! 🙂
    Beautiful wildflowers! We don’t have partridge peas, so I learned a new one! We mow paths through our meadows, too. Great way to see everything (while trying to avoid ticks, too). I love the luminous quality of morning glories – you capture it well. I think your yellow flower is a form of hawkweed (Hieracium).
    All the best to you! ❤

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    1. I love your description of the first flower, David. It’s a rose, but I can see why you’d think it’s a peony. It does look like one. It is the one and only bloom on what appears to be a dying rose bush. Most of the time the blooms die off before they do more than bud.

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  4. You find such wonderful details for each walk you take us on. Thank you for that! Each time I read your blog I say to myself, get out there for a walk! Then I don’t do it. The pixie dust flower is lovely, do you have the color version too?

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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