Posted in Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Gifts, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Sky, Spirit, Summer, Walking & Wandering, Wonder

Break of day

5:30 AM on this warm and humid Thursday.
5:30 AM today.

The fading dawn colors revive momentarily, and the sky shines with lilac and daffodil, layering colors in clouds like quilts stacked on a bed.  More birds chime into the morning air: a nuthatch’s nasal onk joins the crow’s croak and a black-throated green warbler’s murmur from the branches above the mandala.  As the colors finally fade under the fierce gaze of their mother, the sun, a wood thrush caps the dawn chorus with his astounding song.  The song seems to pierce through from another world, carrying with it clarity and ease, purifying me for a few moments with its grace.  Then the song is gone, the veil closes, and I am left with embers of memory.

~ David George Haskell, The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature

Transforming.
Transforming.

I don’t watch many sunrises during the summer months.  Probably because they happen before I am willing to get out of bed.  I think I might make it a point to get up for at least one sunrise per week.  It depends on how my nights go.  Insomnia visits occasionally, and sometimes the best sleep I get all night is in the early morning hours when the sun is thinking about making an appearance in this part of the world.

Feeling heavy.
Feeling heavy.

We are experiencing another extremely hot and humid day, typical of July and August here on the Eastern Shore.  I can’t stay outside for too long, as I learned yesterday when I was distracted by the pretty flowers blooming in the formerly Bare Meadow and didn’t pay attention to how hot I had become.

Flowers in the Bare Meadow.
Flowers in the Bare Meadow.

I didn’t die or pass out or anything, but I did find myself feeling ill from the heat for a short while.  When I entered the coolness of the air conditioned house (where it was 80°F, so “coolness” is a relative term), it felt as though my entire body let out a big sigh of relief.

It is difficult to show you a large meadow filled with flowers.
It is difficult to show you a large meadow filled with flowers.

I do that when I’m photographing something in nature and I get into a kind of creative flow.  I stop paying attention to other external factors such as the heat of summer or the cold of winter.

A Black-Eyed Susan chats with some Partridge Peas.
A Black-Eyed Susan chats with some Partridge Peas.

I also forget about temperature extremes when I feel a sense of wonder, and that is how I felt looking out over the Bare Meadow yesterday.  It is, of course, no longer bare.  A few months ago when the poison ivy was the first thing to grow and thrive in the meadow after the spring mowing, I feared the three-leaf menace would take over the whole area.  For the longest time it seemed as though nothing else would grow out there.

Queen Anne's Lace, Black-Eyed Susans, Daisies, and Morning Glories.
Queen Anne’s Lace, Black-Eyed Susans, Daisies, and Morning Glories.

All of a sudden, or what felt like all of a sudden, flowers appeared.  Morning Glories, Black-Eyed Susans, Partridge Peas, Queen Anne’s Lace, and some kind of Daisy sprung up, bloomed, and covered up the poison ivy.  Oh, I’m sure the poison ivy is still out there, but it’s nice that it isn’t the only plant thriving and growing.

The wildlings.
The wildlings.

Mother Nature has turned the Bare Meadow into a large bouquet of beautiful blooms and foliage.

Partridge Peas and Morning Glory.
Partridge Peas and Morning Glory.

Thank you for stopping by.  I’m going to watch the sunset from the porch today.  It’s much too hot to be out and about.  Sunset has finally moved a little, and is now at 8:28 PM.  Feel free to join me.  We’ll have to watch through the trees, but that’s okay.  We can peep through the branches and the leaves to catch whatever colors might appear, and enjoy the silhouettes of the trees while we’re at it.

A dragonfly.
A dragonfly.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Today’s joys:  Watching the dawn paint colors across the sky; the buzzing of the bees; butterflies in the garden; conservative approaches; an afternoon nap.

Author:

Robin is... too many things to list, but here is a start: an artist and writer; a photographer and saunterer; a daughter and sister and granddaughter; a friend, a partner, a wife, a mother, and a grandmother; a gardener, a great and imaginative cook, and the creator of wonderful sandwiches.

19 thoughts on “Break of day

  1. A dragon fly dancer!. The meadow is dressed do lovely this time of year. (Our morning glories are mainly purple or sometimes blue)
    We’re getting into the time of year that when you go outside you feel like you are swimming in waves of heat. Even early morn, it’s 79 degrees. Only early early or late late dog walks possible. Early you can hear the earth waking

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    1. That’s the best part of early mornings, PhilosopherMouse. 😀 This heat has been overwhelming. And overbearing. It’s not been a very good guest, having stayed too long. Thankfully, we do have a “cool” front coming through tonight that will bring us down to highs in the 80’s rather than upper 90’s.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I don’t do well in humidity – though it is very good for your skin 🙂 [Isn’t there always an up-side?] The wild flowers are lovely – what a wonder it must have been to watch that meadow change just like that. A little touch of summer wonder to brighten my cold wet wintery day. Thank you!

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  3. Loved your quote – I might have to get that book!
    Beautiful sunrise photo – I don’t see many sunrises for the same reasons as you. And the fact that we live with so many trees makes it tough to see more than small patches anyway. There’s a spot on a hill about .5 mi. away if I really was motivated. We often go there to see moonrise.
    Your meadow is lovely. We used to have about an acre of lawn, but I turned most of it to meadow in ’06, and the wildlife has ballooned because of it. Win/win.
    Take care of yourself in that heat, it is serious business! ❤

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    1. Thank you, Eliza. 🙂 Do look for the book. I think you would enjoy it. Haskell’s prose is almost like poetry. It’s obvious his year in the forest was a labor of love.

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  4. A delightful post, as always. Your meadow is beautiful to behold. We have had a rather cool summer so far, and I am enjoying it. Today, however, has been wet-wet-wet! Way too much rain!

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  5. Beautiful pictures. 🙂
    I sometime see a sunrise on my teabreak from the staffroom window, but by the time in walking home from my nightshift the sun is well up.
    I’ve chased a couple of sunsets on the way in over the last few weeks, but in just a few short weeks the lightshows from Ma Nature have moved to before I leave the house.
    On a brighter note though, it won’t be long before I’m watching the sun come up in the morning again. 🙂

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  6. Our summer sunrises are rather bland compared to winter sunrises and summer sunsets. I had hoped for colors this evening but dark gray clouds filled with thunder have found their way here.

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    1. It’s similar here, Carol. I suppose Mother Nature makes up for the winter landscape by giving us the colorful sunrises and sunsets. We don’t need them as much in the summer. 🙂

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  7. Oh my, I know that over-heated feeling so well. When you are outdoors getting lost in nature (I do that as well!) can you take a drink bottle with you? We can get bottles here that clip onto a belt loop, or whatever, leaving your hands free to take photos. Water is my “medicine” during the summer here.

    How I love your wildflowers! We don’t have fields of blooms like that here. If anything is left un-mowed, we simply grow weeds, green weeds, no colour, nothing. So I really appreciate photos like these. 🙂

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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