Posted in Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Garden, Gifts, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Portals & Pathways, Quotes, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Water, Wonder

A springtime walk

Through the woods.
Through the woods.

Our minds, as well as our bodies, have need of the out-of-doors.  Our spirits, too, need simple things, elemental things, the sun and the wind and the rain, moonlight and starlight, sunrise and mist and mossy forest trails, the perfumes of dawn and the smell of fresh-turned earth and the ancient music of wind among the trees.

~ Edwin Way Teale

In a mossy world.
In a mossy world.

Shall we take a walk around the Wabi-Sabi Ranch and see what’s happening?  Spring, once it arrives, moves so quickly it’s hard to keep track of it all.  We’ll head on out of the woods for now because most of what is happening, at least that which is most apparent, is happening elsewhere.

Daffodils near the greenhouse.
Daffodils near the greenhouse.

Most of our daffodils are blooming now.  If you were to take a ride around the neighborhood, on your bike or in your car, you would see that some of the daffodils, those in the sunny spots, are almost finished.

The first fresh veggies of the season.
The first fresh veggies of the season.

The asparagus is poking up out of the ground, and we’ve already picked about a dozen spears.  We’ll have more by the end of the day since it grows so quickly.  M spent a lot of time last year killing off the poison ivy we found growing in the asparagus bed.  So far, there is no sign of it.  Hopefully that means I won’t have to start a new asparagus bed.  Time will tell.

Cherry blossoms.
Cherry blossoms.

Some of the cherry trees are in full bloom.  I spent a little time with the tree out in the meadow, the one I usually refer to as the Mystery Tree (we weren’t sure what it was when it first bloomed last year).

Clustered together.
Clustered together.

Our resident wild turkey has been spotted a few times.  What she’s up to, I couldn’t possibly say.  She spends a lot of time walking between the marsh on the western side of the property and the marsh on the eastern side, traversing the front lawn, back and forth, back and forth.  Perhaps she’s started a new exercise program.

Oh so pretty.
Oh so pretty.

Cornell’s All About Birds website indicates that wild turkeys travel in flocks.  If there are more turkeys around, we haven’t seen them yet.  The male turkeys are said to gather in clearings during the spring to act out their courtship displays, flaring their tail feathers and strutting around.  That would be cool to see.

A delicate display.
A delicate display.

Bees are humming and buzzing around the flowers.  I’ve seen a few different butterflies, but couldn’t tell you what they are.  I haven’t been able to get close enough to identify them.  I think the orange butterfly I saw was an Eastern Comma.  They’re usually the first of the season, feeding on the sap of the maples.

Buzz buzz.
Buzz buzz.

The weather is warming up nicely.  It’s almost perfect right now.  In the mid-70’s, sunny, and with a lovely breeze.

A spring collage of clouds and cherry blossoms.
A spring collage of clouds and cherry blossoms.

I reckon that’s about it from the ranch on this beautiful Monday.  Thank you for visiting and walking along with me.  There are some wispy clouds in the sky that might contribute to an interesting sunset.  Meet you at the dock.  I’m too lazy to go down to the Point today.  Sunset is at 7:37 PM.  You’ll want to be there about twenty minutes early.  Bring a jacket.  It’s warm right now, but cools off quickly once the sun goes down.

Not sure what this is, but it reminds me of a viburnum.
Not sure what this is, but it reminds me of a viburnum.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Oak tree decorations.
Oak tree decorations.

Today’s joys:  Meeting my new primary care physician and liking her; a long walk early this afternoon; watching the wild turkey as she makes her way across the lawn; the floral scent of the air; iced rooibus tea; the spring displays in the trees, meadows, and lawn.

No idea.
No idea.
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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

30 thoughts on “A springtime walk

    1. I am so glad you were able to see D.C. when the cherry trees were in bloom, Pauline. 🙂 The asparagus is early this year, and all the more appreciated for showing up so soon.

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    1. I think so too, CM. They’re so delicate and beautiful, especially in the sunlight. Maybe in the rain, too. I should go out and look (it’s raining today).

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        1. I didn’t. 😦 I got tied up all afternoon with the Great Search for Homeowner’s Insurance. Our current company raised the rate by 27% (!!!!). I eventually found something MUCH better. Goodbye to Nationwide (who was not on my side).

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  1. I love all your springtime photos, Robin. It would be cool to see the wild turkeys, especially in a flock. I’m glad you don’t see any sign of poison ivy in the asparagus. Asparagus is my absolute favorite vegetable, so you’re lucky to have it fresh out of the garden. Happy spring! 🙂

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    1. It is wonderful freshly picked, Cathy. I had an asparagus bed in Ohio, too, and was thrilled to find one here. Now that I know what to do, it would have been no big deal to start over, but I’m glad I don’t have to.

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  2. Oh the smell of magnolias! And your asparagus makes me want to steward a patch, but I don’t have room. A word of advice: if you come upon a group of turkeys in a clearing, back gently out the way you came…

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  3. Oh so lucky to have asparagus growing there. I’ve read about starting an asparagus patch and it sounds complicated and you have to stay put long enough for it to develop. 😉

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    1. It’s not difficult to start an asparagus patch, Gunta. It’s amazingly easy. Throw some asparagus crowns (preferably male) in the ground, let them grow for a year, start harvesting the next year. They used to say you had to wait three years to harvest, but you can do it the first year if you don’t take too much. The asparagus bed I had in Ohio was terribly neglected (I am lazy about weeding), and I swear the asparagus produced more the years I didn’t weed. We don’t weed the patch we have here at all. The only maintenance (aside from removing the poison ivy we found last year) has been to cut down the old ferns before the new spears come up.

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      1. Thanks, Robin. Seems like what I’ve read about starting a bed always sounded so complicated. As in Kingsolver’s book: “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle”. I’ll have to try it, but weirdly we are starting to think of moving a bit south of where we are. Will definitely try it next spring when we know where we are apt to land….

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        1. It was Kingsolver’s book that made me yearn for an asparagus patch, Gunta. She did make it seem complicated, and I did all the things they say you “should” do when I planted my first patch, then I came across an article from the local extension service that basically said, “Nah, you don’t need to do all that.” On top of that, my mother, when I told her about all the work I’d done to plant the asparagus crowns, said, “Why? Just drop them in the ground. They grow like weeds. You know, you’ll never be able to get rid of it now.” Wherever you land, it’s worth giving it a try. The crowns don’t cost much, and fresh asparagus is like fresh corn. The sooner it’s eaten after it’s picked, the better it tastes.

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  4. Today staying with you walking through these nice paths would be for me like a balsam. Today 51 years ago my only daughter was born… but four years ago 14 March, she passed away. Your flowers would do good to me… thanks.

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    1. You’re welcome, Rosa. And hugs to you. I’m so sorry about the loss of your daughter. Thank you for walking along, and I hope the flowers did bring you some peace.

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      1. Asparagus is one of my favorites 😉 All it needs is a light saute in butter or olive oil and a touch of salt. We enjoy it over Trader Joe’s pumpkin ravioli 😉 Happy eating 😉 WG

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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