Posted in Air, Beginnings, Change, Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Garden, Gifts, Gratitude, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Sky, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Water, Weather, Winter, Wonder

The big thaw

Watching the sun slip behind the horizon.  (Yesterday at the Point.)
Watching the sun slip behind the horizon. (Yesterday at the Point.)

The snow has not yet left the earth, but spring is already asking to enter your heart.  If you have ever recovered from a serious illness, you will be familiar with the blessed state of when you are in a delicious state of anticipation, and are liable to smile without any obvious reason.  Evidently that is what nature is experiencing just now.  The ground is cold, mud and snow squelches under foot, but how cheerful, gentle and inviting everything is!  The air is so clear and transparent that if you were to climb to the top of the pigeon loft or the bell tower, you feel you might actually see the whole universe from end to end.  The sun is shining brightly, and its playful, beaming rays are bathing in the puddles along with the sparrows.  The river is swelling and darkening; it has already woken up and very soon will begin to roar.  The trees are bare, but they are already living and breathing.

~ Anton Chekhov, The Exclamation Mark

Thawing.
Thawing.

Yesterday’s sunset was beautiful.  The ice in Tangier Sound has begun to thaw and you can see where the ice stops and the thaw starts in the above picture.  The blue-ish stuff at the bottom (or front) is snow covered ice.

Ducks in the distance.
Ducks in the distance.

The quote I began the post with almost perfectly describes what it is like now here on our part of the Eastern Shore.  I think spring is here, but we’ll have to wait and see.  Snow came as late as March 25th last year.  Even if we get another snow day, it looks as though the long stretches of bitter cold have ended.  We’ll have highs in the 50’s and 60’s for at least the next ten days according to the latest forecast.  It wouldn’t surprise me if we get only two weeks of spring weather and go right into summer.

It was even more beautiful than images can display.
It was even more beautiful than images can display.

I could continue to show you images from yesterday’s sunset, but there’s something else you should see:

First blooms.
First blooms.

I went out for a long walk yesterday afternoon and noticed tiny blue flowers blooming in the grass growing along the sides of the road.  It’s Persian Speedwell and I was surprised to see it blooming already since yesterday was our first really warm day in a long while.  I’d show you a photo of it, but I must have been overly excited when I took pictures of all those beautiful little flowers.  Every single image came out blurry.  I do have a photo from last year which you can see here.  (It’s on the Animals, minerals, and vegetables of the Eastern Shore page of my blog, along with a description, but I sent you straight to the image so you could bypass the scrolling to find it.)

More than a memory.
More than a memory.

When I returned from exploring the neighborhood, I went out to the scrounger’s garden and there they were, crocuses in bloom.  Somehow I managed to contain my excitement enough to get a few good photos.  I went back today to get a few more.

Double delight.
Double delight.

There were about three or four crocuses to be found yesterday.  Today there were ten or twelve.  I suspect tomorrow there will be more.

Reaching for the sun.
Reaching for the sun.

I don’t think it will be long before our daffodils are blooming, too.

Getting ready.
Getting ready.

As you saw in the sunset pictures, we still have some ice and snow, mostly around the edges and in the shady spots.  The ice at the Point was still thick enough that people could walk around on it.  I don’t think the same will be true today.

Inner glow.
Inner glow.

I reckon that’s it from the Wabi-Sabi Ranch on this warm and lovely Monday.  Thank you so much for stopping by.  I’m not sure I’ll make it out to the Point for sunset this evening.  I’ve got a lot of irons in the fire, so to speak, and with the warmer weather, life is going to get even busier.  There are gardens to clean up and seeds to start and all manner of things that need doing.  Winter left a big mess of downed trees and branches that we’ll have to start cleaning up, too.  I might make it to the dock, though, so feel free to join me out there around 6:45 PM.

Happy together.
Happy together.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Joy.
Joy.

Today’s joys:  Crocuses in bloom; feeling and watching the Big Thaw; sunrise; kneeling on the ground this afternoon, inhaling the wonderful scent of the earth; kale, broccoli, and spinach seedlings, ready to plant.

One more.  Just because.
One more. Just because.

 

Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, yoga teacher, sometime poet, wife, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She shares her daily walks and meanders, a lot of quotes, some of her artwork, and a lot of her photography here on Ye Olde Blogge. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are (still!) in the midst of renovating the house and cleaning up the property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

19 thoughts on “The big thaw

  1. So wonderful to see you posting photos of flowers from the garden again! You captured the mood perfectly. We are cautiously ecstatic to feel the warmth of the sun and see the snow nearly gone- though the piles we made when shoveling are still melting, the garden looks poised to relax into spring. Giant hugs 😉 WG

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    1. Thank you, WG. Giant hugs back at you. 🙂 Lucky for us we didn’t have to shovel so we don’t have to wait for piles of snow to melt. I noticed lots of them, mostly in parking lots, when I was out and about this weekend. Some of those piles are so big it might be June before they melt. lol!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 😉 You are right about that! I just hope we have a few weeks of transition before it gets truly hot- especially for those living near rivers where flooding is likely from too fast a melt 😉 Should be another lovely sunset this evening, and warm enough to sit on the dock and enjoy it. Wish I could join you 😉

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  2. Photos of pure delight! Crocus and speedwell – welcome Spring! Your sunset photos make me want to move to the Eastern shore. Every night is beautifully amazing. I live in the hills, so few chances of seeing magnificent sunsets. So glad I get to enjoy yours – thank you!

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  3. Stunning photos, as yours always are. My daffodils will be blooming while I’m gone – makes me sad to miss them. My crocus seem to have gone missing – probably made tasty meals for some of the underground critters.

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  4. You’re from Ohio – it’s the same there with two weeks of spring and straight into summer! In Chicago every year there would come a day when we ran both the furnace and the air conditioning in the same day.

    Great pictures and nice walking with you as always.

    Nancy

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    1. Thank you, Nancy. 🙂 We usually had a good few weeks of spring before going into summer when I lived in Ohio. It was rare to go right into summer there, although it did happen once or twice.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I love that Chekhov quote. He’s a wonderful writer. And it’s nice to know that spring is in the air, if not yet totally underfoot. It makes me smile to see the buds and the promise of spring there on the East Coast. I know it’s been a long winter for everyone. 🙂

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    1. I’ve been trying not to rush through winter or spring, Cathy, mostly because I can’t stand the heat and humidity of summer. But I have to admit I do enjoy seeing things green up and the flowers popping out of the ground. 🙂

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      1. You’re like me, Robin, in your dislike of East Coast summers. Sadly here in Nanning, I have Virginia summer, hot and humid, for 9 months of the year. I do like seeing the green come forth. Nanning is in the subtropics, so it’s green all year. No surprises in spring. 🙂

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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