Posted in A bit of history, Earth, Exploring, Family, Grandparenthood, Photography, Portals & Pathways, Quotes, Spirit, Thursday Travels, Travel, Walking & Wandering, Winter

Time traveling

D.C. War Memorial, Washington, D.C.  (Memorial honoring the 26,000 D.C. citizens who served in World War I.)
D.C. War Memorial, Washington, D.C. (Memorial honoring the 26,000 D.C. citizens who served in World War I.)

Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.  If you can bend space you can bend time also, and if you knew enough and could move faster than light you could travel backward in time and exist in two places at once.

~ Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye

Looking up.  (In the D.C. War Memorial.)
Looking up. (In the D.C. War Memorial.)

We can’t physically travel through time, but I can take you back to our D.C. trip by traveling back through the archives.  This period of being off of my feet has created time for me to do something I should be doing on a regular basis.  Organizing.  My photo files are a mess, and it’s been over a year since I did a secondary back-up.  My primary back-up is on an external hard drive.  My secondary involves burning everything to DVD, a time-consuming task.  Organizing and backing up my images is on my Master List of Things to Do This Year.  Isn’t it convenient, and wonderful, that Life has handed me both time and opportunity to get it done?

Looking back (at the D.C. War Memorial).
Looking back (at the D.C. War Memorial).

During our last trip back through time and the archives, we left off at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial (see Love Harmonizes).  The next memorial we came upon was the D.C. War Memorial.  This was my first visit to the D.C. War Memorial.

The names of the men and women from the District of Columbia who gave their lives in the World War are here inscribed as a perpetual record of their patriotic service to their country. Those who fell and those who survived have given to this and to future generations an example of high idealism courageous sacrifice and gallant achievement – D.C. War Memorial Inscription

I bet it looks really pretty when the trees are leafed out in the spring and summer, and with the colors of the fall foliage in the autumn.

On our way to the Lincoln Memorial.
On our way to the Lincoln Memorial.

We didn’t stay long at the D.C. War Memorial.  We were on our way to the Lincoln Memorial, something my oldest granddaughter, Emma, really wanted to see.

Passing by the Korean War Veterans Memorial.
Passing by the Korean War Veterans Memorial.

I would like to have stopped at the Korean War Veterans Memorial.  I’ve been there before, but for some reason I don’t have many photos of it.  The statues, to me, look ghostly.  There are 19 of them, larger than life (around 7 feet 3 inches), and I think the girls would have been fascinated by them while learning a little history.  We had already done so much walking by that time, and it was nearing the lunch hour (which would involve a lot more walking to get to a restaurant) so we decided to skip the Korean War Veterans Memorial this time around.

Going up.
Going up.

There are 57 steps leading up to the Lincoln Memorial.  It looks like more than that, doesn’t it?  While we climb up, I will tell you a story about Maddy (my youngest granddaughter).  She might not appreciate the telling of this story so let’s keep it between us, shall we?

Dizzying.
Dizzying.

As we were approaching the Lincoln Memorial, Maddy had a seat on a bench and declared that she didn’t want to go to the Lincoln Memorial.  It took me a while to figure out the why of it because Maddy was shy about the reason.

Looking out over the National Mall from the top of the steps.
Looking out over the National Mall from the top of the steps.

You see, Emma and Maddy had recently seen the movie Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian.  (You can watch the trailer here if you’re unfamiliar with it.)  In the film, the statue of Abraham Lincoln comes to life.  (If you watcher the trailer, you’ll see Lincoln get up and leave his seat about two minutes into it.)  Maddy was afraid that might happen while we were visiting the memorial.  It took a few minutes to convince her that the statue of Lincoln wasn’t going to move, get up, or go anywhere.  Mostly it was a matter of reminding her that what she saw was just a movie, something Emma thought to do.  She’s smart that way (and knows her little sister pretty well).

One more look at the National Mall before we go inside the Lincoln Memorial.
One more look at the National Mall before we go inside the Lincoln Memorial.

Thank goodness we were right!  I don’t know what I would have done if that statue had come to life.  Maddy would never have trusted any of us again.

The famous statue.
The famous statue.

If I were a little girl (or boy), I might find the statue intimidating even without having seen the movie.  Even as an adult, I feel like old Abe was looming over me.

A side view.
A side view.

I’m not sure if this is true, but judging by the number of people always milling about whenever I’ve visited the Lincoln Memorial, it seems to be one of the most popular memorials on the National Mall.

Just to give you a sense of scale.
Just to give you a sense of scale.

It is time for us to leave the Lincoln Memorial and Washington, D.C. for now.  Our next stop, when I get around to it, will be the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the White House.  Or at least a glimpse of the White House.  I might resurrect Thursday Travels (something I used to do on my old blog, Life in the Bogs).  I still have travel photos from years ago that I haven’t shared (Maine, anyone?).

Turning heads.  (Leaving the Lincoln Memorial.)
Turning heads. (Leaving the Lincoln Memorial.)

Thanks for dropping in today.  It’s currently snowing here at the Wabi-Sabi Ranch.  So far, it’s not sticking.  Nonetheless, I’m excited to see it, and I’m hoping that eventually it will stick and accumulate so I can go out and play in it tomorrow.  There’s no point in heading out to the dock or the Point for sunset since we won’t be able to see anything except clouds and snowflakes.  (Yay, snowflakes!)

I know my friends up north are not excited to see this, but I am.
I know my friends up north are not excited to see this, but I am.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

Today’s joys:  Snow!!!; my wellies because they keep my feet warm and dry (we’ve had so much rain that it’s boggy out there); garden thoughts and planning; seed catalogs arriving in the mail; watching the tide go out.

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

17 thoughts on “Time traveling

    1. There is so much to see just on the Mall area, Pauline. I hope you have a chance to visit most of it. Since you’ll be there in the spring, if the weather is good, I think you’ll really enjoy all the outdoor monuments and memorials (especially if those cherry trees are blossoming!).

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  1. I found this post really interesting – 26000 Americans served in WW1 – I never knew that! Amazing! I loved the pictures too. Aren’t these memorials morbidly fascinating? I agree with you about the Korean “ghosts” – very eerie, which I’m sure was the intention. I do remember visiting the Vietnam wall memorial in DC when I was 16 and being incredibly moved by it.

    As for Maddy, you did well to get her up there, I’d say. Kids’ fears make them very stubborn, don’t they? How lovely that Emma helped. Sisterly love? xxx

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  2. Snowflakes are pretty and exciting if you get them rarely. But truly, I was watching the flurries coming down today and was thinking if I had a video camera, how pretty it would be to film them. It is mesmerizing and soothing.

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  3. Wish I could send you some of our snow, Robin! More expected tomorrow…

    I love Maddy’s story, and I’m glad Emma was there to add her insight to the situation for you. 🙂 I saw the Lincoln Memorial when I was a child and remember how awe-inspiring it was, so life-like. Perhaps I should return to see it through adult eyes.

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    1. Thank you, Barbara. If I could take some of it off your hands (land), I would. Our snow didn’t last long and didn’t stick. Ah well. Winter isn’t over just yet.

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    1. It’s the strangest thing, Elisa, but whenever it snows, I feel like I’m 8 or 9 years old again, sneaking out in the middle of the night to dance in the snow under the full moon. 🙂

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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