Posted in Earth, Eastern Shore, Exploring, Fire, Food, Home, Life, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Recipes, Spirit, Walking & Wandering, Water, Winter

If we were having coffee

coffee2Pull up a chair.  Take a taste.  Come join us.  Life is so endlessly delicious.

~ Ruth Reichl

Winter finery.
Winter finery.

If we were having coffee (or tea or whatever your choice of beverage happens to be), I would tell you that this has been a good week.  It was a week of learning to slow down, of healing, of good news, of witnessing, and of mostly sunny days.  It was a week of taking quiet, leisurely walks, and stopping to sit on a fallen tree trunk or a bench just to look, listen, and take in all that surrounds me.  It was a week of settling into my own being.

Rainbow swirls.
Rainbow swirls.

If we were having coffee, I would tell you about the book I’m reading: A Tale for the Time Being: A Novel by Ruth Ozeki.  Oldest Son and his wife gave it to me for Christmas.  I am enjoying this book so much that I can’t decide if I want to savor it by reading it as slowly as possible, loitering in the story and words, or if I want to dash through it to find out what happens.  I’ve taken a kind of middle ground, sometimes moving forward quickly, sometimes going back to reread a portion of it, thereby stalling and taking time to think about what I read.  It is, so far, a wonderful read, and I love the way the author plays with the idea of and the word “time.”

… I am a time being.  Do you know what a time being is?  Well, if you give me a moment, I will tell you.  A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be.

~ Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being

I sometimes think, as I’m reading the book, that the author intended it to be read the way I’m reading it.  The dilemma I’m having — waffling between reading fast and slow — is similar to the dilemma one of the main characters encounters when she begins to read a diary that she found washed up on shore.

Ice thumbs.
Ice thumbs.

If we were having coffee, I would have you sit very far away from me right now because you really don’t want me breathing too close to you.  I’ve been spending time in the kitchen today.  I made a chimichurri sauce to use up some parsley and cilantro we had in the fridge.  Chimichurri sauce is an Argentinian sauce usually used on meat.  M and I don’t eat much meat, but I’ve been craving a nice, big, juicy steak since the surgery and since tomorrow is going to be warm, we’re thinking about picking up a couple of steaks and grilling them for dinner.  We can use the sauce on vegetarian or fish dishes, too.

These devils are why I'd suggest you keep your distance.
These devils are why I’d suggest you keep your distance.

For lunch today, I made noodle bowls with rice noodles, baked tofu, black beans, broccoli, and a Green Onion-Miso Dressing.  The recipe is in Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s Appetite for Reduction: 125 Fast and Filling Low-Fat Vegan Recipes.  She makes it with soba noodles, which I did have on hand.  I picked rice noodles because the package was open after using some for another recipe.  We had trouble with pantry pests soon after moving here, and I try to use up open boxes and bags of grains and things made with grains.  I also package grains and grain products in air-tight containers once they’re open if I’m not using them all at once.

Black beans.
Black beans.

If we were having coffee, I would offer you some of this yummy lunch, but I would also warn you that the Green Onion-Miso Dressing is powerful stuff.  I’m pretty sure M and I will have onion breath for at least a week.  The dressing also has raw garlic in it so we’re pretty potent right now.  It doesn’t taste of strong onions at first.  It gradually sneaks up on you until you realize that your eyes are almost watering.  I want to try making the dressing again in the spring, when the milder spring onions are available.

The recipe for the dressing, in case you're interested.
The recipe for the dressing, in case you’re interested.

If we were having coffee, I’d invite you to take a walk with me now.  It’s almost 50°F outside, the sun is shining, and we should go out and see what there is to see.  I’m going to the beach tomorrow in hopes of catching the snow geese before they move north.  You’re welcome to join me on that outing, too.

More spring growth.
More spring growth.

Thanks for visiting, and having a beverage or two with me.  If you’re not in any hurry, let’s take that walk, and then I’ll have to get back to the kitchen.  I have a new recipe for a cauliflower soup that I plan to make for dinner.  It looks a little labor intensive so I should get an early start on it.  If you can stay for sunset, the soup should be ready by then and you’re welcome to have some after we return from the dock.  Sunset today is at 5:32 PM.  Can you believe that?  The days continue to stretch their way towards spring and summer.

Our chickadees like to hang by their feet.
Our chickadees like to hang by their feet.

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

This post is in response to Part Time Monster’s #WeekendCoffeeShare.  Jump in and join us.  I’d love to hear all about what you were up to this week.

Author:

Robin is... too many things to list, but here is a start: an artist and writer; a photographer and saunterer; a daughter and sister and granddaughter; a friend, a partner, a wife, a mother, and a grandmother; a gardener, a great and imaginative cook, and the creator of wonderful sandwiches.

26 thoughts on “If we were having coffee

    1. Oh yes, Dana! I think I learn as much from fiction as I do from non-fiction. Maybe more because stories have a way of sinking in softly, magically, whereas non-fiction can sometimes want to hit you over the head with facts. “A Tale for the Time Being” is a wonderful book so far, although it does cover some tough subjects (the tsunami in Japan, bullying, depression). I know the part in parentheses makes it sound awful, but it’s not. Or it is, but it’s not. I don’t know how to explain it.

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  1. The book sounds fascinating – I shall add it to my wish list! It is nice to drop by and listen quietly to where you are at, what you are making and of course, what you are reading! I always leave uplifted!

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  2. Ice thumbs! Never seen those before 🙂 I eat garlic in hummus nearly every day, so we wouldn’t have to sit all that far apart! 😉 Glad it has been a good week and you are on the mend.

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  3. Love the chickadee shot, Robin!

    About raw garlic – you reminded me of an elderly woman I once knew, she was an immigrant from Italy and ate raw garlic every day, and used it in all of her cooking. (She also grew her own grapes and made her own wine.) She exuded garlic with every move she made, but she was as healthy as an ox and lived well into her 90s.

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    1. Thanks, Barbara. 🙂 I love garlic, but I’m not sure I want to exude it with every move I make. Then again, if it means I’d be as healthy as an ox… why not? 😀

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  4. I like the idea of a coffee share. I might well jump in and join you… although I doubt I’ll make it every week, I won’t beat myself up about it, but I’ll share a cup or two whenever I get around to it. 🙂
    Cauliflower soup sounds good too.
    I tried to make it once, I cooked cauliflower, potatoes and a small bacon joint in a slowcooker. The idea was to blend the other ingredients and then to add the “pulled” bacon joint.
    It all tasted disgusting… ugh! I’ll find a recipe to follow next time. 😀

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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