Posted in Beginnings, Change, Earth, Eastern Shore, Fire, Home, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Simplicity, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering

Daylilies and dragonflies

Two by the greenhouse
The daylilies are blooming

All of us, children and adults, are beautiful flowers.  Our eyelids are exactly like rose petals, especially when our eyes are closed.  Our ears are like morning glories listening to the sounds of birds.  Our lips form a beautiful flower every time we smile.  And our two hands are a lotus flower with five petals.  The practice is to keep our “flowerness” alive and present, not just for our own benefit but for the happiness of everyone.

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

My first dragonfly capture here on the Eastern Shore (and of the season).
My first dragonfly capture here on the Eastern Shore (and of the season).

I love the idea of practicing to keep our “flowerness” alive.  Root, and bloom.  Isn’t there some old saying about blooming or flowering where you’re planted?  (I’m being lazy and not looking it up.)

June 2013 026a

‘Tis a warm (mid-80’s) and breezy day here at the Wabi-Sabi Ranch.  The bugs are taking over, but I did not let that keep me from taking a walk.  In fact, I went trolling for deerflies this morning.  You’ve never been trolling for deerflies?  I’d like to say it’s great fun, but really, it’s not.

Mushrooms are popping up all over.
Mushrooms are popping up all over.

Back in the Bogs, M used to troll for deerflies using the garden tractor.  You start with a blue cup or bowl.  You spray it with sticky-tacky stuff (that’s my official name for it).  Then, if you have a tractor, you attach the cup to the front of the tractor and drive around slowly, picking up deerflies as you move along.  They are said to be attracted to the movement and the color blue.  The sticky-tacky stuff captures them when they land on the cup, ready to cut (deerflies don’t bite; they cut into you).

Today's view from the dock
Today’s view from the dock

We haven’t started the tractor here yet, so that means I have to troll for deerflies by walking around.  I put the blue cup with the sticky-tacky stuff on a pole so it’s taller than me.  Deerflies usually go for the head area and a moving blue cup on a pole apparently looks like a head to them.  They aim for the tallest area.

The magnolias are blooming, too.
The magnolias are blooming, too.

The idea is to capture as many deeflies as you can while not getting bitten.  Most will go for the fake head on the pole, but others are too clever by far and go for the real head beneath the hat.  Trolling (killing) makes it possible to walk around without getting attacked.  I walk around slowly in an area where I’d like to stop and take a photo, capturing deerflies until there are no more bothering me.  Then I stick the pole in the ground, take the photo or photos, and move on to the next place.

Decorating the dock with found items.
Decorating the dock with found items.

It is impossible to stop and take pictures without trolling first.  I’d get eaten alive.  It is through trolling that I am able to get to the dock.  The deerflies are particularly bad in the woods.

Where the deerflies live.
Where the deerflies live.  (I intentionally made this hazy to give you some idea of the thickness of the air, even with a good breeze a’blowin’.)

I hadn’t meant to write about trolling, but I guess it couldn’t be avoided.  I wanted you to know how it is I can still manage to get outside.  Trolling doesn’t help with the noseums, though, so I still need a solution for that.  Any ideas or suggestions?  I did buy some netting to put over my head, but that won’t keep noseums out because they’re very tiny.

The Yucca near the pergola ruins is blooming.
The Yucca near the pergola ruins is blooming.

While out trolling, I got to pondering the possibility of another commitment to get outside every day.  For a year.  (For those of you new to my blog or blogs, I did this back in 2010-2011.  You can find the short version of that year posted here.)  I already know it will be far too easy for me to give up on my daily walks.  I have the perfect excuses:  Heat, humidity, and insects.

Bedraggled
Bedraggled

It’s a bother to go outside.  It’s work.  Even getting prepared to go outside is work, almost more work than preparing to go outside on a below freezing, snowy day in the Bogs.  You can see how I might persuade myself on a hot, sticky, insect-filled day, that it’s not worth the bother or the work.

This was my first glimpse of the daylilies.  I didn't know we had them here until today.
This was my first glimpse of the daylilies. I didn’t know we had them here until today.

I won’t start the commitment now (although I should).  Perhaps on the Solstice, but more likely I’ll stick with my usual Autumn Equinox date because I’m still in the midst of my year-long meditation commitment.  You’d never know it by how little I mention it.  I haven’t brought it up lately because I’ve been rushing through my seated meditation every day for the past few months.  That’s not a good way to meditate.  Now that things have settled, I hope to settle, too.  To give myself the time and space to meditate as I would like.

June 2013 021a

Well, I’m running late with just about everything today so I should wrap this up.  Thank you for stopping by, and joining me on another walk.  At least it didn’t rain today.  Yesterday we had an incredible (amazing!) downpour.  A half inch of rain fell in less than five minutes.  I’ve never seen anything like it before.

Yesterday's deluge
Yesterday’s deluge

Be good, be kind, be loving.  Just Be.  🙂

When it rains, it pours.
When it rains, it pours.

Author:

Robin is...

23 thoughts on “Daylilies and dragonflies

  1. so funny to read about your dreadful deer flies as i am being savagely attacked by mosquitos here in derby …. we leave on the boat today … insects will,rule the earth one day they say … i can quite believe it! meanwhile thank you dear heart for the idea of flowerness … i shall head out shortly with all petals open to the sun 🙂

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    1. I can believe it too, Christine. Insects are tenacious. No matter what we try to do to them, they always come back.
      All petals open to the sun… how wonderful. 🙂

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  2. ah Robin, your description of ‘trolling’ had my mind boggling. but I can imagine the need and the sheer desperation not to be torn to shreds. Flipping insects seem to be prolific this year, Mayhap the torrential rain and warmer weather have the answer. Love the daylillies, we have some which last year were eaten by the scarlet Lilly beetle and snails too, hardly any blooms were left, but this year we’re preparing copper strips on the tubs in the hope it’ll stop the little munching snails. No sign as yet of the pretty scarlet little beasts, and I live in hope they were all killed. ( very bloodthirsty I know, but you should have seen the mess they made!! 🙂 ) anywho, killing aside, ’twas a great visit and a refreshing breather. happy new trails, I’m off to bed again, (’tis 03.50am) nightmares woke me for some reason..(mayhap the little critters are getting their own back ) xPenx

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    1. Snails and slugs tend to give me nightmares, Pen. The slimy creatures give me the shudders (yet a snake does not… how odd!). I hope your flowers do well this year. 🙂

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  3. I don’t think I’ve ever encountered deerflies or no-see-ums. Looks like I’ve found something to be thankful for today! 🙂

    (And not to rub it in or anything, but after decades spent suffering the wrath of mosquitoes in the prairie provinces, I’m excited to say that Victoria doesn’t get any mosquitoes, either. This is AWESOME, considering we work outside and would be eaten alive otherwise.)

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  4. Love that quote by Thich Nhat Hanh; it’s so beautiful. I also have to motivate myself to go out in the heat. I’d rather go out on a cold day any time. Too bad about those deer flies. Those would keep me inside for sure!

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    1. I’m trying to motivate myself now, Cathy, to go out. I can see the deer flies flitting around, and it’s already in the mid-80’s. It does seem to be quite breezy. That might help. 🙂

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  5. That pergola has me imagining clinking and clanking bits of colored glass and the tinkle and dingle of wind chime-type objects! Almost like a bottle tree, but less neat.

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    1. What a wonderful imagining, Elisa! 🙂 There are pieces of broken gourds (some clay, some natural) hanging on the pergola right now. I think colored glass would look and sound better.

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  6. Welcome to my woodsy world! I know it is awful … as I sit here wondering if it is worth the bugginess to go out and get a picture of a newly blooming iris down by the lake. I never heard of your blue sticky stuff/trolling method. (send me more details). Right now it is mostly billions of mosquitoes .. but the deer flies and horse flies will start soon.
    Thanks for sharing your buggy knowledge … I learned a lot … I should not be wearing blue (which I do quite often)! I did not know they “cut” you .. it always felt like they were pinching me really small and hard …. and I should be taking someone much taller than me on walks (offer them a blue hat to wear) so the bugs bug them instead of me 😉

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  7. I haven’t heard of deer flies Robin (I was waiting for a photo of those captured!) but we do have horse flies and march flies here, both of which bite! I feel so much empathy for you with the heat and humidity and have no idea of anything to suggest to cope with it, other than stay indoors with the air-conditioning! 🙂

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    1. Staying indoors does the trick, Joanne, but there are prettier pictures to be found outside. 🙂 I thought about taking a photo of the captured deer flies, but it’s pretty ugly.

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  8. Wow, does this sound familiar. We have been dealing with tent caterpillars for the past month or so – multiple search and destroy missions every day, It’s not that they’re harmful to us, but they’re here in the millions and we don’t work at it, they’ll destroy our fruit trees, shrubs, food garden etc. So like you, we troll (though I hadn’t thought of calling it that), searching for caterpillars and now, for their cocoons (each cocoon we destroy prevents up to 350 new eggs from being laid). it’s like waging war – a hard thing to come to terms with for two aging peace activists, for sure. The deer flies sound awful! But your photos are wonderful. I especially love the images of the rain, and the dragonflies. Are those salmon berry bushes in the gorgeous photo with the dragonfly that you’ve used as a page banner? Can this be…that you have salmon berries there too, on the other side of the continent? If not, they are certainly a lookalike!

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    1. Thank you, Laurie. 🙂 I’m not sure what kind of bushes they are, but will look into it. I think they’re either raspberry or blackberry bushes, as it sounds like salmonberry bushes are more likely to be found on the west coast. I know what you mean about waging war, and how it contradicts the idea of peace and doing no harm.

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  9. That’s really something about the deerflies! I’ve had plenty of walks ruined by them, and I know what you mean about a walk turning into a run just to get away from them. I didn’t realize they “cut” either – no wonder they hurt so much! The dragonfly captures are wonderful. Just saw my first one of the season, but didn’t have camera in hand.

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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