Posted in Earth, Eastern Shore, Maryland, Mindfulness, Nature, Photography, Quotes, Saturday Storytime, Spirit, Spring, Walking & Wandering, Water

Saturday storytime

While Andrea was with us yesterday
While Andrea was with us yesterday

The storm starts, when the drops start dropping
When the drops stop dropping then the storm starts stopping.

~ Dr. Seuss

Raindrops on roses
Raindrops on roses

As far as storms go, Andrea didn’t turn out to be too bad for us here at the Wabi-Sabi Ranch.  A check this morning showed that we had about 2 inches of rain during her visit.  I’m not sure why it’s still raining today, but it is.

Around 1:00 pm today.
Around 1:00 pm today.

In addition to the rain, the air is very warm.  It’s a bit like living in the tropics.

Raindrops on juniper
Raindrops on juniper

I didn’t factor in tropical storms and hurricanes when making my list of pros and cons of living on the Eastern Shore.  I don’t know how I missed that, especially in view of the fact that we saw some of the damage caused by last year’s Hurricane Sandy when we were touring the area and looking for a house.

June 2013 011a

Well, I did say this would be a new adventure, “adventure” being the key word in this thought.

Watching the rain
Watching the rain.  (Kitchen windows.)

Summer in the deep South is not only a season, a climate, it’s a dimension.  Floating in it, one must be either proud or submerged.

~ Eugene Walter

Lashing the trees
Lashing the trees

The Eastern Shore of Maryland, although south of the Mason-Dixon Line, is hardly the Deep South.  Yet it does have some elements of it.

During a break in the storm
During a break in the storm

There is the physical atmosphere.  The heat, the humidity, and the insects, oh my.

Indigo Bunting
Indigo Bunting

I think there is a southern mentality here as well.  I don’t necessarily hear it in the speech (accents), although there is such a mix of accents that it’s not unusual to hear the voice of Virginia or North Carolina.  It’s more in the behavior, the slowness, the attitude that things will happen in good time.

I sometimes find myself getting impatient with the leisureliness.  It’s a lesson I learned before, but have forgotten.  A long time ago, early in our marriage, M and I lived in South Carolina.  After about two years of living there, I was speaking with family up north and my aunt was talking so fast that I had to ask her to slow down because I couldn’t understand her.  She replied that she was going to ask me to speak faster as she found the drawl I’d acquired too slow.  I explained that it’s hot in the south so everything moves slowly, even the tongue.  She said it’s cold in the north and no one has time to stand around speaking slowly when all you want to do is get indoors and warm up.

Maybe the Delmarva Peninsula should be called the Emerald Peninsula.
Maybe the Delmarva Peninsula should be called the Emerald Peninsula.

And that’s my story for this rainy Saturday.  Thank you for stopping by.  Perhaps you have a short story of your own you’d like to share.  Have you moved around a lot?   A little?  Or not at all?  I have to admit that I sometimes envy people who have rooted where they were born.  It must be a wonderful feeling to have such a deep feeling of home.  I think those of us who move around have to find a way to carry home with us, usually in our hearts.

June 2013 013a

Be good, be kind, be loving,  Just Be.  🙂

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Author:

Robin is a photographer, artist, writer, wife, sometime poet, mom, grandma, daughter, sister, friend, and occasional traveler currently living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She finished a 365 commitment to get outside every day in 2011, and has turned it into a lifelong commitment taking one or more walks each day. Robin will continue to share her walks through her words and images on Breezes at Dawn. Older posts can be found at Life in the Bogs, her previous blog. Robin and her husband are in the midst of renovating the house and property they refer to as the Wabi-Sabi Ranch, 35 acres that include marsh, a dock on a tidal creek, meadows, and woodlands. Every day brings new discoveries.

26 thoughts on “Saturday storytime

    1. Thank you, Amy. 🙂 That was my first sighting of an Indigo Bunting. It’s not a great (close-up and detailed shot), but I was thrilled to catch it.

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  1. You are feeling more like yourself again or is it just an impression? I say it because of the pictures, they are getting more “you” than the first you took at your new place.
    I´ve been living in this city all my life. But there is a cultural difference for that. Had I been born in US, I would have lived in every state. People here don´t move, specially if you were born in BA. The top universities are in BA, the financial district, the best job opportunities. People migrate to other countries but don´t move within the country. The slow rhythm you describe is the description of any place outside BA, specially the North, which is very hot. Mmm too long for a comment to tell you about the whole cultural difference !!! it´ll look like a blog inside a blog LOL Have a good Sunday!!!

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    1. Perhaps, Ellen. I have days when I feel more like “me,” and days when I don’t. I think you should write a blog post about the whole cultural difference. 🙂

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      1. It´s an interesting topic to write about!! and I´ll do it when I feel better. Right now, I´m barely posting and it´s not because I have nothing to share, but I´m with my fingers on the keyboard and they don´t move!!

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  2. I know we’ve talked about this subject of moving around or staying put before. It is true, I do have deeply rooted strong feelings of home. It was really awesome for me to watch my daughter graduate from the same school system that I did 26 years ago, on Friday night. But I do have an itch to explore beyond my known world. I don’t know what form that will take, but I know it needs to be scratched some day!
    Love seeing the indigo bunting – that’s a new one for me!

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  3. Beautiful photos, Robin. We lived in southern Virginia for several years, and yes, the atmosphere in the summer is very physical. And after 25 years, I still say ‘you’all” every once in a while 🙂

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  4. trying to imagine your voice and your accent now Robin, in fact .. most people when you comment regularly on their blogs, become friends and yet not a word is exchanged… Not that it matters, just it’s another connection I suppose. You made me laugh with the conversation between you and your Aunt., I have cousins who are Geordies, hailing from Newcastle, .and trying to understand their conversation is like trying to catch a fly,.. ‘cos the thing is I should understand what they’re saying, but my ear seems not attuned anymore.. 😉 England is a small Country and distances are so very different than in the US, You can travel there and back to most places in a day. so moving away from an area doesn’t hit as hard emotionally, it just depends on the circumstances…. Loved the photo of the Indigo Bunting, what a fantastic deep colour, simply amazing to see. … and the opening shot of Andrea on action, looked to be a story in itself….. happy new trails, my friend.. xPenx

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    1. Thank you, Pen. 🙂 Even in your small country, accents differ. I noticed that when traveling around England. But I can see what you mean about distances and moving.

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  5. I love “Raindrops on Roses”, your second photo! It’s so dramatic, yet so soft, and I always enjoy Dr. Seuss and his play with words.

    In Australia, although the land mass of the country would be comparable in size to the USA, there are no differing accents for any regions in the whole country. We live on the eastern coast, yet people on the western coast, down south and up north all speak the same. Yet in the USA and also the UK, different regions, and even towns, have very definite accents.

    My son Ben, the one who spent five weeks travelling around the USA last year, told us how the Americans could never distinguish between an Australian accent and a New Zealand one. I laughed and told him that was strange, as New Zealanders speak very differently to us. BUT, Ben said that after hearing mostly American accents for a few weeks, even they couldn’t pick the difference between an Aussie and a New Zealander!

    You’ve got me thinking about the moving around or staying put question Robin. I can feel a blog post coming on. 🙂

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    1. Thank you, Joanne. 🙂 That’s really interesting about the accents in Australia. I would have thought there might be differences depending on where you live. I know I can’t tell the difference between a Aussie and New Zealand accent. lol! To be honest, I have trouble figuring out accents as a whole, even across the U.S. Southern accents are easy, although placing them in a particular state is not (for me — I’m sure there are people who can tell within a few words where a person is from).

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  6. thank you for stormy monsoonal images and thoughts dear robin …. we are in the far NW corner of Australia right now, very warm for us but winter for them, another place where things happen in their own good time ….. fortunately the storm has stopped but water is still lying everywhere after record june rainfall 🙂

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  7. I suddenly wished that we’d talked on the phone and I knew how your voice sounded. Have often be so surprised by the voices of blogger-friends. Liking the sound of Wabi-Sabi Ranch. Liking the sound of that more measured peacefulness and knowing how we northerners can just be so darn fast.

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        1. lol! I enjoy all your comments, Kathy. 🙂 I suppose there are advantages and disadvantages to both ways of living. I’ve been fortunate enough to have had the opportunity and time to get to know a couple of different regions (13 years in southern Ohio, near West Virginia and Kentucky, learning about coal country and Appalachia; 13 years in northeastern Ohio learning about winter and snow and ice). And now here I am in the sub-tropics. I wonder what this area will teach me… ?

          We should talk on the phone sometime although I’ll warn you that I’m shy and awkward on the phone. I think I sound like a duck. lol!

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          1. Ducks are some of my favorite people. I would love that, Robin! Sometimes I am really quiet in person. Other times very talkative. You are very fortunate indeed to have grown roots in more than one region. Think of all you’ve learned.

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  8. When I first moved away from my home city (Calgary), I was looking for a slower, more leisurely pace. The hurrying and rushing of Calgary really grated on me, but when I came to Victoria, *I* was the impatient, rushing one for a time! I wondered why everybody drove so slowly and why my orders weren’t going to be ready within 24 hours. Oops! I’m living on island time now, but it definitely was an adjustment!

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    1. lol, Dana! We call it Eastern Shore Time. Whenever someone is late for an appointment (they always are), M reminds me that everyone else is on Eastern Shore Time and I’ll just have to adjust. 🙂

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Comments are delightful and always appreciated. I will respond when I can (life is keeping me busy!), and/or come around to visit you at your place soon. Thank you!

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